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The significance of Rome lies primarily in the fact that it is the city of the pope. The Bishop of Rome, as the successor of St. Peter, is the Vicar of Christ on earth and the visible head of the Catholic Church. Rome is consequently the centre of unity in belief, the source of ecclesiastical jurisdiction and the seat of the supreme authority which can bind by its enactments the faithful throughout the world. The Diocese of Rome is known as the "See of Peter", the "Apostolic See" , the "Holy Roman Church " the "Holy See" -- titles which indicate its unique position in Christendom and suggest the origin of its preeminence. Rome, more than any other city, bears witness both to the past splendour of the pagan world and to the triumph of Christianity. It is here that the history of the Church can be traced from the earliest days, from the humble beginnings in the Catacombs to the majestic ritual of St. Peter's. At every turn one comes upon places hallowed by the deaths of the martyrs, the lives of innumerable saints, the memories of wise and holy pontiffs. From Rome the bearers of the Gospel message went out to the peoples of Europe and eventually to the uttermost ends of the earth. To Rome, again, in every age countless pilgrims have thronged from all the nations, and especially from English-speaking countries. With religion the missionaries carried the best elements of ancient culture and civilization which Rome had preserved amid all the vicissitudes of barbaric invasion. To these treasures of antiquity have been added the productions of a nobler art inspired by higher ideals, that have filled Rome with masterpieces in architecture, painting, and sculpture. These appeal indeed to every mind endowed with artistic perception; but their full meaning only the Catholic believer can appreciate, because he alone, in his deepest thought and feeling, is at one with the spirit that pulsates here in the heart of the Christian world.

Many details concerning Rome have been set forth in other articles of THE CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA. For the prerogatives of the papacy the reader is referred to POPE ; for the ecclesiastical government of the city and diocese, to CARDINAL VICAR ; for liturgical matters, to ROMAN RITE ; for education, to ROMAN COLLEGES ; for literary development, to ROMAN ACADEMIES ; for history, to the biographical articles on the various popes, and the articles CONSTANTINE THE GREAT, CHARLEMAGNE, etc. There is a special article on each of the religious orders, saints, and artists mentioned in this article, while the details of the papal administration, both spiritual and temporal, will be found treated under APOSTOLIC CAMERA ; PONTIFICAL AUDIENCES ; APOSTOLIC EXAMINERS ; HOLY SEE ; PAPAL RESCRIPTS ; ROMAN CONGREGATIONS ; ROMAN CURIA ; SACRA ROMANA ROTA ; STATES OF THE CHURCH, etc. Of the great Christian monuments of the Eternal City, special articles are devoted to BASILICA OF ST. PETER ; TOMB OF ST. PETER ; LATERAN BASILICA ; VATICAN ; CHAIR OF PETER .

The present article will be divided:

  • Topography and Existing Conditions;
  • General History of the City;
  • Churches and other Monuments.

I. TOPOGRAPHY AND EXISTING CONDITIONS

The City of Rome rises on the banks of the Tiber at a distance of from 16 to 19 miles from the mouth of that river, which makes a deep furrow in the plain which extends between the Alban hills, to the south; the hills of Palestrina and Tivoli, and the Sabine hills, to the east: and the Umbrian hills and Monte Tolfa, to the north. The city stands in latitude 41°54' N. and longitude 12°30' E. of Greenwich. It occupies, on the left bank, not only the plain, but also the adjacent heights, namely, portions of the Parioli hills, of the Pincian, the Quirinal, the Viminal, the Esquiline (which are only the extremities of a mountain-mass of tufa extending to the Alban hills), the Capitoline, the Cælian, the Palatine, and the Aventine -- hills which are now isolated. On the right bank is the valley lying beneath Monte Mario the Vatican, and the Janiculan, the last-named of which has now become covered with houses and gardens. The Tiber, traversing the city, forms two sharp bends and an island (S. Bartolomeo), and within the city its banks are protected by the strong and lofty walls which were begun in 1875. The river is crossed by fourteen bridges, one of them being only provisional, while ten have been built since 1870. There is also a railroad drawbridge near St. Paul's. Navigation on the river is practicable only for vessels of light draught, which anchor at Ripa Grande, taking cargoes of oil and other commodities.

For the cure of souls, the city is divided into 54 parishes (including 7 in the suburbs), administered partly by secular clergy, partly by regular. The boundaries of the parishes have been radically changed by Pius X, to meet new needs arising out of topographical changes. Each parish has, besides its parish priest, one or two assistant priests, a chief sacristan, and an indeterminate number of chaplains. The parish priests every year elect a chamberlain of the clergy, whose position is purely honorary; every month they assemble for a conference to discuss cases in moral theology and also the practical exigencies of the ministry. In each parish there is a parochial committee for Catholic works; each has its various confraternities, many of which have their own church and oratory. In the vast extent of country outside of Rome, along the main highways, there are chapels for the accommodation of the few settled inhabitants, and the labourers and shepherds who from October to July are engaged in the work of the open country. In former times most of these chapels had priests of their own, who also kept schools ; nowadays, through the exertions of the Society for the Religious Aid of the Agro Romano (i.e. the country districts around Rome), priests are taken thither from Rome every Sunday to say Mass, catechize, and preach on the Gospel. The houses of male religious number about 160; of female religious, 205, for the most part devoted to teaching, ministering to the sick in public and private hospitals, managing various houses of retreat etc. Besides the three patriarchal chapters ( see below, under "Churches"), there are at Rome eleven collegiate chapters.

In the patriarchal basilicas there are confessors for all the principal languages. Some nations have their national churches (Germans, Anima and Campo Santo; French, S. Luigi and S. Claudio; Croats, S. Girolamo dei Schiavoni; Belgians, S. Giuliano; Portuguese, S. Antonio; Spaniards, S. Maria in Monserrato; to all which may be added the churches of the Oriental rites ). Moreover, in the churches and chapels of many religious houses, particularly the generalates, as well as in the various national colleges, it is possible for foreigners to fulfil their religious obligations. For English-speaking persons the convents of the Irish Dominicans (S. Clemente) and of the Irish Franciscans (S. Isidoro), the English, Irish, and American Colleges, the new Church of S. Patrizio in the Via Ludovisi, that of S. Giorgio of the English Sisters in the Via S. Sebastianello, and particularly S. Silvestro in Capite (Pallottini) should be mentioned. In these churches, too, there are, regularly, sermons in English on feast-day afternoons, during Lent and Advent, and on other occasions. Sometimes there are sermons in English in other churches also, notice being given beforehand by bills posted outside the churches and by advertisements in the papers. First Communions are mostly made in the parish churches; many parents place their daughters in seclusion during the period of immediate preparation, in some educational institution. There are also two institutions for the preparation of boys for their First Communion, one of them without charge (Ponte Rotto). Christian doctrine is taught both in the day and night schools which are dependent either on the Holy See, or on religious congregations or Catholic associations. For those who attend the public elementary schools, parochial catechism is provided on Sunday and feast-day afternoons. For intermediate and university students suitable schools of religious instruction have been formed, connected with the language schools and the scholastic ripetizioni , so as to attract the young men. The confraternities, altogether 92 in number, are either professional (for members of certain professions or trades), or national, or for some charitable object (e.g., for charity to prisoners ; S. Lucia del Gonfalone and others like it, for giving dowries to poor young women of good character ; the Confraternità della Morte, for burying those who die in the country districts, and various confraternities for escorting funerals, of which the principal one is that of the Sacconi; that of S. Giovanni Decollato, to assist persons condemned to death ), or again they have some purely devotional aim, like the Confraternities of the Blessed Sacrament, of the Christian Doctrine, of the various mysteries of religion, and of certain saints.

For ecclesiastical instruction there are in the city, besides the various Italian and foreign colleges, three great ecclesiastical universities : the Gregorian, under the Jesuits ; the Schools of the Roman Seminary, at S. Apollinare; the Collegio Angelico of the Dominicans, formerly known as the Minerva. Several religious orders also have schools of their own -- the Benedictines at S. Anselmo, the Franciscans at S. Antonio, the Redemptorists at S. Alfonso, the Calced Carmelites at the College of S. Alberto, the. Capuchina the Minor Conventuals, the Augustinians, and others. ( See ROMAN COLLEGES .) For classical studies there are, besides the schools of S. Apollinare, the Collegio Massimo, under the Jesuits, comprising also elementary and technical schools ; the Collegio Nazareno (Piarists), the gymnasium and intermediate school of which take rank with those of the Government; the Instituto Angelo Mai (Barnabite). The Brothers of the Christian Schools have a flourishing technical institute (de Merode) with a boarding-house ( convitto ). There are eight colleges for youths under the direction of ecclesiastics or religious. The Holy See and the Society for the Protection of Catholic Interests also maintain forty-six elementary schools for the people mostly under the care of religious congregations. For the education of girls there are twenty-six institutions directed by Sisters, some of which also receive day-pupils. The orphanages are nine in number, and some of them are connected with technical and industrial schools. The Salesians, too, have a similar institution, and there are two agricultural institutions. Hospices are provided for converts from the Christian sects and for Hebrew neophytes. Thirty other houses of refuge, for infants, orphans, old people, etc., are directed by religious men or women.

As the capital of Italy, Rome is the residence of the reigning house, the ministers, the tribunals, and the other civil and military officials of both the national Government and the provincial. For public instruction there are the university, two technical institutes, a commercial high school, five gymnasium-lyceums, eight technical schools, a female institute for the preparation of secondary teachers, a national boarding school, and other lay institutions, besides a military college. There are also several private schools for languages etc. -- the Vaticana, the Nazionale (formed out of the libraries of the Roman College, of the Aracœli Convent and other monastic libraries partially ruined), the Corsiniana (now the School of the Accademia dei Lincei), the Casanatense (see CASANATTA), the Angelica (formerly belonging to the Augustinians), the Vallicellana (Oratorians, founded by Cardinal Baronius ), the Militare Centrale, the Chigiana, and others. (For the academies see ACADEMIES, ROMAN.) Foreign nations maintain institutions for artistic, historical, or archæological study (America, Great Britain, Austria-Hungary, Prussia, Holland, Belgium, France ). There are three astronomical and meteorological observatories: the Vatican, the Capitol (Campidoglio), and the Roman College ( Jesuit ), the last-named, situated on the Janiculan, has been suppressed. The museums and galleries worthy of mention are the Vatican (see VATICAN), those of Christian and of profane antiquities at the Lateran (famous for the "Dancing Satyr"; the "Sophocles", one of the finest of portrait statues in existence found at Terracina ; the "Neptune", the pagan and Christian sarcophagi with decorations in relief, and the statue of Hippolytus ). In the gallery at the Lateran there are paintings by Crivelli, Gozzoli, Lippi, Spagna, Francia, Palmezzano, Sassoferrato, and Seitz. The Capitoline Museum contains Roman prehistoric tombs and household furniture, reliefs from the Arch of Marcus Aurelius , a head of Amalasunta, a half-length figure of the Emperor Commodus, the epitaph of the infant prodigy Quintus Sulpicius Maximus, the Esquiline and the Capitoline Venuses, "Diana of the Ephesians", the Capitoline Wolf (Etruscan work of the fifth century B. C. ), Marforius, the Dying Gladiator, busts of the emperors and other famous men of antiquity, and Vespasian's "Lex regia"; the Gallery contains works by Spagna, Tintoretto, Caracci, Caravaggio, Guercino (St. Petronilla, the original of the mosaic in St. Peter's), Guido Reni, Titian, Van Dyke, Domenichino, Paolo Veronese, and other masters. There are important numismatic collections and collections of gold jewelry. The Villa Giulia has a collection of Etruscan terracotta; the Museo Romano, objects recently excavated; the Museo Kircheriano has been enlarged into an ethnographical museum. The Borghese Gallery is in the villa of the same name. The National Gallery, in the Exposition Building ( Palazzo dell' Esposizione ), is formed out of the Corsini, Sciarra, and Torlonia collections, together with modern acquisitions. There are also various private collections in different parts of the city.

The institutions of public charity are all consolidated in the Congregazione di Carità, under the Communal Administration. There are twenty-seven public hospitals, the most important of which are: the Polyclinic, which is destined to absorb all the others; S. Spirito, to which is annexed the lunatic asylum and the foundling hospital ; S. Salvatore, a hospital for women, in the Lateran; S. Giacomo; S. Antonio; the Consolazione; two military hospitals. There are also an institute for the blind, two clinics for diseases of the eye, twenty-five asylums for abandoned children, three lying-in hospitals, and numerous private clinics for paying patients. The great public promenades are the Pincian, adjoining the Villa Borghese and now known as the Umberto Primo, where a zoological garden has recently been installed, and the Janiculum. Several private parks or gardens, as the Villa Pamphili, are also accessible to the public every day.

The population of Rome in 1901 was 462,783. Of these 5000 were Protestants, 7000 Jews, 8200 of other religions and no religion. In the census now (1910) being made an increase of more than 100,000 is expected. Rome is now the most salubrious of all the large cities of Italy, its mortality for 1907 being 18.8 per thousand, against 19.9 at Milan and 19.6 at Turin. The Press is represented by five agencies: there are 17 daily papers, two of them Catholic ("Osservatore Romano" and "Corriere d'Italia"); 8 periodicals are issued once or oftener in the week (5 catholic, 4 in English -- "Rome", "Roman Herald", "Roman Messenger", "Roman World"); 88 are issued more than once a month (7 Catholic ); there are 101 monthlies (19 Catholic ); 55 periodicals appear less frequently than once a month.

II. GENERAL HISTORY OF THE CITY

Arms and implements of the Palæolithic Age, found in the near vicinity of Rome, testify to the presence of man here in those remote times. The most recent excavations have established that as early as the eighth century B. C. or, according to some, several centuries earlier, there was a group of human habitations on the Palatine Hill, a tufaceous ledge rising in the midst of marshy ground near the Tiber. (That river, it may be observed here, was known to the primitive peoples by the name of Rumo , "the River".) Thus is the traditional account of the origin of Rome substantially verified. At the same time, or very little later, a colony of Sabines was formed on the Quirinal, and on the Esquiline an Etruscan colony. Between the Palatine and the Quirinal rose the Capitoline, once covered by two sacred groves, afterwards occupied by the temple of Jupiter and the Rock. Within a small space, therefore, were established the advance guards of three distinct peoples of different characters; the Latins, shepherds; the Sabines, tillers of the soil; the Etruscans, already far advanced in civilization, and therefore in commerce and the industries. How these three villages became a city, with, first, the Latin influence preponderating, then the Sabine, then the Etruscan (the two Tarquins), is all enveloped in the obscurity of the history of the seven kings (753-509 B. C. ). The same uncertainty prevails as to the conquests made at the expense of the surrounding peoples. it is unquestionable that all those conquests had to be made afresh after the expulsion of the kings.

But the social organization of the new city during this period stands out clearly: There were three original tribes: the Ramnians (Latins), the Titians (Sabines), and the Luceres (Etruscans). Each tribe was divided into ten curiœ , each curia into ten gentes ; each gens into ten (or thirty) families. Those who belonged to these, the most ancient, tribes were Patricians, and the chiefs of the three hundred gentes formed the Senate. In the course of time and the wars with surrounding peoples, new inhabitants occupied the remaining hills; thus, under Tullus Hostilius, the Cælian was assigned to the population of the razed Alba Longa (Albano); the Sabines, conquered by Ancus Martius, had the Aventine. Later on, the Viminal was occupied. The new inhabitants formed the Plebeians ( Plebs ), and their civil rights were less than those of the older citizens. The internal history of Rome down to the Imperial Period is nothing but a struggle of plebeians against patricians for the acquisition of greater civil rights, and these struggles resulted in the civil, political, and juridical organization of Rome. The king was high-priest, judge, leader in war and head of the Government; the Senate and the Comitia of the People were convoked by him at his pleasure, and debated the measures proposed by him. Moreover, the kingly dignity was hereditary. Among the important public works in this earliest period were the drains, or sewers ( cloacœ ), for draining the marshes around the Palatine, the work of the Etruscan Tarquinius Priscus; the city wall was built by Servius Tullius, who also organized the Plebeians, dividing them into thirty tribes; the Sublician Bridge was constructed to unite the Rome of that time with the Janiculan.

During the splendid reign of Tarquinius Superbus, Rome was the mistress of Latium as far as Circeii and Signia. But, returning victorious from Ardea, the king found the gates of the city closed against him. Rome took to itself a republican form of government, with two consuls, who held office for only one year; only in times of difficulty was a dictator elected, to wield unlimited power. In the expulsion of Tarquinius Superbus some historians have seen a revolt of the Latin element against Etruscan domination. Besides wars and treaties with the Latins and other peoples, the principal events, down to the burning of Rome by the Gauls, were the institution of the tribunes of the people ( tribuni plebis ), the establishment of the laws of the Twelve Tables, and the destruction of Veii. In 390 the Romans were defeated by the Gauls near the River Allia; a few days later the city was taken and set on fire, and after the Gauls had departed it was rebuilt without plan or rule. Cumillus, the dictator, reorganized the army and, after long resistance to the change, at last consented that one of the consuls should be a plebeian. Southern Etruria became subject to Rome, with the capture of Nepi and Sutri in 386. The Appian Way and Aqueduct were constructed at this period. Very soon it was possible to think of conquering the whole peninsula. The principal stages of this conquest are formed by the three wars against the Samnites (victory of Suesaula 343); the victory of Bovianum, 304; those over the Etruscans and Umbrians, in 310 and 308; lastly the victory of Sentinum, in 295, over the combined Samnites, Etruscans, and Gauls. The Tarentine (282-272) and the First and Second Punic Wars (264-201) determined the conquest of the rest of Italy, with the adjacent islands, as well as the first invasion of Spain.

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Soon after this, the Kingdom of Macedonia (Cynoscephalæ, 197; Pydna, 168) and Greece (capture of Corinth, 146) were subdued, while the war against Antiochus of Syria (192-89) and against the Galatians (189) brought Roman supremacy into Asia, In 146 Carthage was destroyed, and Africa reduced to subjection; between 149 and 133 the conquest of Spain was completed. Everywhere Roman colonies sprang up. With conquest, the luxurious vices of the conquered peoples also came to Rome, and thus the contrast between patricians and plebeians was accentuated. To champion the cause of the plebeians there arose the brothers Tiberius and Calus Gracchus. The Servile Wars (132-171) and the Jugurthine War (111-105) revealed the utter corruption of Roman society. Marius and Sulla, both of whom had won glory in foreign wars, rallied to them the two opposing parties, Democratic and Aristocratic, respectively. Sulla firmly established his dictatorship with the victory of the Colline Gate (83), reorganized the administration, and enacted some good laws to arrest the moral decay of the city. But the times were ripe for the oligarchy, which was to lead in the natural course of events to the monarchy. In the year 60, Cæsar, Pompey, and Crassus formed the first Triumvirate. While Cæsar conquered Gaul (58-50), and Crassus waged an unsuccessful war against the Parthians (54-53), Pompey succeeded in gaining supreme control of the capital. The war between Pompey to whom the nobles adhered, and Cæsar, who had the democracy with him, was inevitable. The battle of Pharsalia (48) decided the issue; in 45 Cæsar was already thinking of establishing monarchical government; his assassination (44) could do no more than delay the movement towards monarchy. Another triumvirate was soon formed by Antony, Lepidus, and Octavian; Antony and Octavian disagreed, and at Actium (32) the issue was decided in Octavian's favour. Roman power had meanwhile been consolidated and extended in Spain, in Gaul, and even as far as Pannonia, in Pontus, in Palestine, and in Egypt. Henceforward Roman history is no longer the history of the City of Rome, although it was only under Caracalla ( A. D. 211) that Roman citizenship was accorded to all free subjects of the empire.

In the midst of these political vicissitudes the city was growing and being beautified with temples and other buildings, public and private. On the Campus Martius and beyond the Tiber, at the foot of the Janiculan, new and populous quarters sprang up with theatres (those of Pompey and of Marcellus) and circuses (the Maximus and the Flaminius, 221 B. C. ). The centre of political life was the Forum, which had been the market before the centre of buying and selling was transferred, in 388, to the Campus Martius ( Forum Holitorium ), leaving the old Forum Romanum to the business of the State. Here were the temples of Concord (366), Saturn (497), the Dî Consentes, Castor and Pollux (484), the Basilica Æmilia (179), the Basilica Julia (45), the Curia Hostilia (S. Adriano), the Rostra, etc. Scarcely had the empire been consolidated when Augustus turned his attention to the embellishment of Rome, and succeeding emperors followed his example: brick-built Rome became marble Rome. After the sixth decade B.C. many Hebrews had settled at Rome, in the Trastevere quarter and that of the Porta Capena, and soon they became a financial power. They were incessantly making proselytes, especially among the women of the upper classes. The names of thirteen synagogues are known as existing (though not all at the same time ) at Rome during the Imperial Period. Thus was the way prepared for the Gospel, whereby Rome, already mistress of the world, was to be given a new sublimer and more lasting, title to that dominion -- the dominion over the souls of all mankind.

Even on the Day of Pentecost, "Roman strangers" ( advenœ Romani , Acts 2:10 ) were present at Jerusalem, and they surely must have carried the good news to their fellow-citizens at Rome. Ancient tradition assigns to the year 42 the first coming of St. Peter to Rome, though, according to the pseudo-Clementine Epistles, St. Barnabas was the first to preach the Gospel in the Eternal City. Under Claudius (c. A.D. 50), the name of Christ had become such an occasion of discord among the Hebrews of Rome that the emperor drove them all out of the city, though they were not long in returning. About ten years later Paul also arrived, a prisoner, and exercised a vigorous apostolate during his sojourn. The Christians were numerous at that time, even at the imperial Court. The burning of the city -- by order of Nero, who wished to effect a thorough renovation -- was the pretext for the first official persecution of the Christian name. Moreover, it was very natural that persecution, which had been occasional, should in course of time have become general and systematic; hence it is unnecessary to transfer the date of the Apostles' martyrdom from the year 67, assigned by tradition, to the year 64 (see PETER, SAINT; PAUL, SAINT). Domitian's reign took its victims both from among the opponents of absolutism and from the Christians ; among them some who were of very exalted rank -- Titus Flavius Clemens, Acilius Glabrio (Cemetery of Priscilla), and Flavia Domitilla, a relative of the emperor. It must have been then, too, that St. John, according to a very ancient legend ( Tertullian ), was brought to Rome.

The reign of Trajan and Adrian was the culminating point of the arts at Rome. The Roman martyrdoms attributed to this period are, with the exception of St. Ignatius's, somewhat doubtful. At the same time the heads of various Gnostic sects settled at Rome, notably Valentinus, Cerdon, and Marcion ; but it does not appear that they had any great following. Under Antoninus, Marcus Aurelius, and Commodus, several Roman martyrs are known -- Pope St. Telesphorus, Sts. Lucius, Ptolemæus, Justin and companions, and the Senator Apollonius. Under Commodus, thanks to Martia, his morganatic wife, the condition of the Christians improved. At the same time the schools of Rhodon, St. Justin, and others flourished. But three new heresies from the East brought serious trouble to the internal peace of the Church : that of Theodotus, the shoemaker of Byzantium; that of Noetus brought in by one Epigonus; and Montanism. In the struggle against these heresies, particularly the last-named, the priest Hippolytus, a disciple of St. Irenæus, bore a distinguished part but he, in his turn, incurred the censures of Popes Zephyrinus and Callistus and became the leader of a schismatical party. But the controversies between Hippolytus and Callistus were not confined to theological questions, but also bore upon discipline, the pope thinking proper to introduce certain restrictions. Another sect transplanted to Rome at this period was that of the Elcesaites.

The persecution of Septimius Severus does not appear to have been very acute at Rome, where, before this time, many persons of rank -- even of the imperial household -- had been Christians. The long period of tranquillity, hardly interrupted by Maximinus (235-38), fostered the growth of Roman church organization; so much so that, under Cornelius, after the first fury of the Decian persecution, the city numbered about 50,000 Christians. The last-named persecution produced many Roman martyrs -- Pope St. Fabian among the first -- and many apostates, and the problem of reconciling the latter resulted in the schism of Novatian. The persecution of Valerian, too, fell first upon the Church of Rome. Under Aurelian (271-76), the menace of an invasion of the Germans who had already advanced as far as Pesaro compelled the emperor to restore and extend the walls of Rome. The persecution of Diocletian also had its victims in the city, although there are no trustworthy records of them; it did not last long, however, in the West. Maxentius went so far as to restore to the Christians their cemeteries and other landed property, and, if we are to believe Eusebius, ended by showing them favour, as a means of winning popularity. At this period several pretentious buildings were erected -- baths, a circus, a basilica, etc. In the fourth and fifth centuries the city began to be embellished with Christian buildings, and the moribund art of antiquity thus received a new accession of vitality.

Of the heresies of this period, Arianism alone disturbed the religious peace for a brief space; even Pelagianiam failed to take root. The conflict between triumphant Christianity and dying Paganism was more bitter. Symmachus, Prætextatus, and Nicomachus were the most zealous and most powerful defenders of the ancient religion. At Milan, St. Ambrose kept watch. By the end of the fourth century the deserted temples were becoming filled with cobwebs; pontiffs and vestals were demanding baptism. The statues of the gods served as public ornaments; precious objects were seldom plundered, and until the year 526 not one temple was converted to the uses of Christian worship. In, 402 the necessity once more arose of fortifying Rome. The capital of the world, which had never beheld a hostile army since the days of Hannibal, in 408 withstood the double siege of Alaric. But the Senate, mainly at the instigation of a pagan minority, treated with Alaric, deposed Honorius, and enthroned a new emperor Attalus. Two years later, Alaric returned, succeeded in taking the city, and sacked it. It is false, however, that the destruction of Rome began then. Under Alaric, as in the Gothic war of the sixth century, only so much was destroyed as military exigencies rendered inevitable. The intervention of St. Leo the Great saved the Eternal City from the fury of Attila, but could not prevent the Vandals, in 456, from sacking it without mercy for fifteen days: statues, gold, silver, bronze, brass -- whether the property of the State, or of the Church, or of private persons -- were taken and shipped to Carthage.

Rome still called itself the capital of the empire, but since the second century it had seen the emperors only at rare and fleeting moments; even the kings of Italy preferred Ravenna as a residence. Theodoric, nevertheless, made provision for the outward magnificence of the city, preserving its monuments so far as was possible. Pope St. Agapetus and the learned Cassiodorus entertained the idea of creating at Rome a school of advanced Scripture studies, on the model of that which flourished at Edessa, but the Gothic invasion made shipwreck of this design. In that Titanic war Rome stood five sieges. In 536 Belisarius took it without striking a blow. Next year Vitiges besieged it, cutting the aqueducts, plundering the outlying villas, and even penetrating into the catacombs ; the city would have been taken had not the garrison of Hadrian's tomb defended themselves with fragments of the statues of heroes and gods which they found in that monument. Soon after the departure of Pope Vigilius from Rome (November, 545), King Totila invested it and captured a fleet bearing supplies sent by Vigilius, who by that time had passed over to Sicily. In December, 546, the city was captured, through the treachery of the Isaurian soldiery, and once more sacked. Totila, obliged to set out for the south, forced the whole population of Rome to leave the city, so that it was left uninhabited; but they returned with Belisarius in 547. Two years later, another Isaurian treachery made Totila once more master of the city, which then for the last time saw the games of the circus. After the battle of Taginæ (552), Rome opened its gates to Narces and became Byzantine. The ancient Senate and the Roman nobility were extinct. There was a breathing-space of sixteen years, and then the Lombards drew near to Rome, pillaging and destroying the neighbouring regions. St. Gregory the Great has described the lamentable condition of the city; the same saint did his best to remedy matters. The seventh century was disastrously marked by a violent assault on the Lateran made by Mauricius, the chartularius of the Exarch of Ravenna (640), by the exile of Pope St. Martin (653), and by the visit of the Emperor Constans I (663). The imprisonment of St. Sergius, which had been ordered by Justinian II, was prevented by the native troops of the Exarchate.

In the eighth century the Lombards, with Liutprand, were seized with the old idea of occupying all Italy, and Rome in particular. The popes, from Gregory II on, saved the city and Italy from Lombard domination by the power of their threats, until they were finally rescued by the aid of Pepin, when Rome and the peninsula came under Frankish domination. Provision was made for the material well-being of the city by repairs on the walls and the aqueducts, and by the establishment of agricultural colonies ( domus cultœ ) for the cultivation of the wide domains surrounding the city. But in Rome itself there were various factions -- favouring either the Franks or the Lombards, or, later on, Frankish or Nationalist -- and these factions often caused tumults, as, in particular, on the death of Paul I (767) and at the beginning of Leo III's pontificate (795). With the coronation of Charlemagne (799) Rome became finally detached from the Empire of the East. Though the pope was master of Rome, the power of the Sword was wielded by the imperial missi , and this arrangement came to be more clearly defined by the Constitution of Lothair (824). Thus the government was divided. In the ninth century the pope had to defend Rome and Central Italy against the Saracens. Gregoriopolis, the Leonine City, placed outside the walls for the defence of the Basilica of St. Peter, and sacked in 846, and Joannipolis, for the defence of St. Paul's were built by Gregory IV, Leo IV , and John VIII. The latter two and John X also gained splendid victories over these barbarians.

The decline of the Carlovingian dynasty was not without its effect upon the papacy and upon Rome, which became a mere lordship of the great feudal families, especially those of Theodora and Marozia. When Hugh of Provence wished to marry Marozia, so as to become master of Rome, his son Alberic rebelled against him and was elected their chief by the Romans, with the title of Patrician ( Patricius ) and Consul. The temporal power of the pope might then have come to an end, had not John, Alberic's son, reunited the two powers. But John's life and his conduct of the government necessitated the intervention of the Emperor Otto I (963), who instituted the office of prœfectus urbis , to represent the imperial authority. (This office became hereditary in the Vico family.) Order did not reign for long: Crescentius, leader of the anti-papal party, deposed and murdered popes. It was only for a few brief intervals that Otto II (980) and Otto III (996-998-1002) were able to re-establish the imperial and pontifical authority. At the beginning of the eleventh century three popes of the family of the counts of Tusculum immediately succeeded each other, and the last of the three, Benedict IX, led a life so scandalous as made it necessary for Henry III to intervene (1046). The schism of Honorius II and the struggle between Gregory VII and Henry IV exasperated party passions at Rome, and conspicuous in the struggle was another Crescentius, a member of the Imperialist Party. Robert Guiscard, called to the rescue by Gregory VII, sacked the city and burned a great part of it, with immense destruction of monuments and documents. The struggle was revived under Henry V, and Rome was repeatedly besieged by the imperial troops.

Then followed the schism of Pier Leone (Anacletus II), which had hardly been ended, in 1143, when Girolamo di Pierleone, counselled by Arnold of Brescia, made Rome into a republic, modelled after the Lombard communes, under the rule of fifty-six senators. In vain did Lucius II attack the Capitol, attempting to drive out the usurpers. The commune was in opposition no less to the imperial than to the papal authority. At first the popes thought to lean on the emperors, and thus Adrian IV induced Barbarossa to burn Arnold alive (1155). Still, just as in the preceding century, every coronation of an emperor was accompanied by quarrels and fights between the Romans and the imperial soldiery. In 1188 a modus vivendi was established between the commune and Clement III, the people recognizing the pope's sovereignty and conceding to him the right of coinage, the senators and military captains being obliged to swear fealty to him. But the friction did not cease. Innocent III (1203) was obliged to flee from Rome, but, on the other hand, the friendly disposition of the mercantile middle class facilitated his return and secured to him some influence in the affairs of the communes, in which he obtained the appointment of a chief of the Senate, known as "the senator" (1207). The Senate, therefore, was reduced to the status of the Communal Council of Rome; the senator was the syndic, or mayor, and remained so until 1870. In the conflicts between the popes, on the one hand, and, on the other Frederick II and his heirs, the Senate was mostly Imperialist, cherishing some sort of desire for the ancient independence; at times, however, it was divided against itself (as in 1262, for Richard, brother of the King of England, against Manfred, King of Naples ).

In 1263 Charles of Anjou, returning from the conquest of Naples, caused himself to be elected senator for life;. but Urban IV obliged him to be content with a term of ten years. Nicholas III forbade that any foreign prince should be elected senator, and in 1278 he himself held the office. The election was always to be subject to the pope's approval. However, these laws soon fell into desuetude. The absence of the popes from Rome had the most disastrous results for the city: anarchy prevailed; the powerful families of Colonna, Savelli, Orsini, Anguillara, and others lorded it with no one to gainsay them; the pope's vicars were either stupid or weak; the monuments crumbled of themselves or were destroyed; sheep and cows were penned in the Lateran Basilica ; no new buildings arose, except the innumerable towers, or keeps, of which Brancaleone degli Andalò, the senator (1252-56) caused more than a hundred to be pulled down; the revival of art, so promising in the thirteenth century was abruptly cut off. The mad enterprise of Cola di Rieuzo only added to the general confusion. The population was reduced to about 17,000. The Schism of the West, with the wars of King Ladislaus (1408 and 1460, siege and sack of Rome), kept the city from benefiting by the popes' return as quickly as it should. Noteworthy, however, is the understanding between Boniface IX and the Senate as to their respective rights (1393). This pope and Innocent VII also made provision for the restoration of the city.

With Martin V the renascence of Rome began. Eugene IV again was driven out by the Romans, and Nicholas V had to punish the conspiracy of Stefano Porcari; but the patronage of letters by the popes and the new spirit of humanism obliterated the memory of these longings for independence. Rome became the city of the arts and of letters, of luxury and of dissoluteness. The population, too, changed in character and dialect, which had before more nearly approached the Neapolitan, but now showed the influence of immigration from Tuscany, Umbria, and the Marches. The sack of 1527 was a judgment, and a salutary warning to begin that reformation of manners to which the Brothers of the Oratory of Divine Love (the nucleus of the Theatine Order ) and, later, the Jesuits and St. Philip Neri devoted themselves. In the war between Paul IV and Philip II (1556), the Colonna for the last time displayed their insubordination to the Pontific

More Volume: R 452

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Article
Râle, Sebastian

Sebastian Rale (Rasle)

Missionary, martyr, b. at Pontarlier, Diocese of Besançoison, 20 Jan., 1654 (?); shot by ...
Räss, Andreas

Andreas Rass

Bishop of Strasburg, b. at Sigolsheim in upper Alsace, 6 April, 1794; d. at Strasburg, 17 ...
Régis, Jean-Baptiste

Jean-Baptiste Regis

Born at Istres, Provence, 11 June, 1663, or 29 Jan., 1664; died at Peking, 24 Nov., 1738. He was ...
Régis, Pierre Sylvain

Pierre Sylvain Regis

Born at La Salvetat de Blanquefort, near Agen, in 1632; died in Paris, in 1707. After his ...
Rabanus, Blessed Maurus Magnentius

Blessed Maurus Magnentius Rabanus

( Also Hrabanus, Reabanus). Abbot of Fulda, Archbishop of Mainz, celebrated theological ...
Rabbi and Rabbinism

Rabbi and Rabbinism

The special condition which prevailed in Palestine after the Restoration led to the gradually ...
Rabbulas

Rabbulas

Bishop of Edessa and, in the later years of his life, one of the foremost opponents of ...
Rabelais, François

Francois Rabelais

The life of this celebrated French writer is full of obscurities. He was born at Chinon in ...
Raccolta

Raccolta

( Italian "a collection") A book containing prayers and pious exercises to which the popes ...
Race, Human

Human Race

Mankind exhibits differences which have been variously interpreted. Some consider them so great ...
Race, Negro

Negro Race

The term negro , derived from the Spanish and the Latin words meaning "black" ( negro; niger ...
Rachel

Rachel

Rachel ("a ewe"), daughter of Laban and younger sister of Lia. The journey of Jacob to the ...
Racine, Jean

Jean Racine

Dramatist, b. a La Ferté-Milon, in the old Duchy of Valois, 20 Dec., 1639; d. in Paris, ...
Rader, Matthew

Matthew Rader

Philologist and historian, born at Innichen in the Tyrol in 1561; died at Munich, 22 December, ...
Radewyns, Florens

Florens Radewyns

Co-founder of the Brethren of the Common Life , b. at Leyderdam, near Utrecht, about 1350; d. at ...
Radowitz, Joseph Maria von

Joseph Maria von Radowitz

Born at Blankenburg, 6 February, 1797; died at Berlin, 25 December, 1853. Radowitz was of ...
Radulph of Rivo

Radulph of Rivo

(or OF TONGRES; RADULPH VAN DER BEEKE) An historian and liturgist, born at Breda, in Dutch ...
Raffeix, Pierre

Pierre Raffeix

Missionary, born at Clermont, 1633; died at Quebec, 1724. He entered the Society of Jesus in ...
Ragueneau, Paul

Paul Ragueneau

Jesuit missionary, b. in Paris, 18 March, 1608; d. 8 Sept., 1680. He entered the Society in ...
Ragusa

Ragusa

DIOCESE OF RAGUSA (EPIDAURUS; RAGUSINA). A bishopric in Dalmatia, suffragan of Zara. The ...
Raich, Johann Michael

Johann Michael Raich

Catholic theologian, born at Ottobeuren in Bavaria, 17 January, 1832; died at Mainz, 28 March, ...
Rail, Altar

Altar Rail

The railing which guards the sanctuary and separates the latter from the body of the church. It ...
Raimondi, Marcantonio

Marcantonio Raimondi

Engraver, b. at Bologna, 1475 (1480?); d. there, 1530 (1534?). He studied under the goldsmith and ...
Rainald of Dassel

Rainald of Dassel

Born probably not before 1115; died in Italy, 14 August, 1167. A younger son of a rich Saxon ...
Rajpootana

Rajpootana

Prefecture Apostolic in India, attached to the Province of Agra, comprises approximately the ...
Ralph Crockett, Venerable

Ven. Ralph Crockett

English martyr, b. at Barton, near Farndon, Cheshire; executed at Chichester, 1 October, 1588. ...
Ralph Milner, Venerable

Venerable Ralph Milner

Layman and martyr, born at Flacsted, Hants, England, early in the sixteenth century; suffered ...
Ralph Sherwin, Blessed

Bl. Ralph Sherwin

English martyr, born 1550 at Rodesley, near Longford, Derbyshire; died at Tyburn, 1 December, ...
Ram, Pierre François Xavier de

Pierre Francois Xavier de Ram

Born at Louvain 2 Sept., 1804; died there 14 May, 1865; Belgian historian and rector of the ...
Ramatha

Ramatha

A titular see in Palestine, suppressed in 1884 by the Roman Curia . It was never an episcopal ...
Rambler, The

The Rambler

A Catholic periodical (not of course to be confused with the older "Rambler", published a ...
Rameau, Jean-Philippe

Jean-Philippe Rameau

Musician, b. at Dijon, Burgundy, 25 Sept., 1683; d. at Paris, 12 Sept., 1764. His father, ...
Ramsey Abbey

Ramsey Abbey

Ramsey Abbey, Huntingdonshire, England, was founded by Ailwine (Ethelwine, Egelwine), a Saxon ...
Ramus, Peter

Peter Ramus

(PIERRE DE LA RAMÉE) Humanist and logician, b. at Cuth in Picardy, 1515; d. in Paris, ...
Rancé, Jean-Armand le Bouthillier de

Jean-Armand Le Bouthillier de Rance

Abbot and reformer of Notre Dame de la Trappe, second son of Denis Bouthillier, Lord of ...
Randall, James Ryder

James Ryder Randall

Journalist and poet, b. 1 Jan., 1839, at Baltimore, Maryland ; d. 15 Jan., 1908 at Augusta, ...
Ransom, Feast of Our Lady of

Feast of Our Lady of Ransom

24 September, a double major, commemorates the foundation of the Mercedarians. On 10 August, ...
Raphael

Raphael (1483-1520)

The most famous name in the history of painting, b. at Urbino, 6 April (or 28 March), 1483; d. at ...
Raphael, Saint

St. Raphael the Archangel

The name of this archangel ( Raphael = " God has healed") does not appear in the Hebrew ...
Raphoe

Raphoe

Diocese of Raphoe (Rapotensis) Comprises the greater part of the Co. Donegal (Gael. Tirconail ...
Rapin, René

Rene Rapin

French Jesuit, born at Tours, 1621; died in Paris, 1687. He entered the Society in 1639, taught ...
Raskolniks

Raskolniks

(Russian raskolnik , a schismatic, a dissenter; from raskol , schism, splitting; that in ...
Rathborne, Joseph

Joseph Rathborne

Priest and controversialist (sometimes erroneously called RATHBONE), born at Lincoln, 11 May, ...
Ratherius of Verona

Ratherius of Verona

He was born about 887; died at Namur 25 April, 974. He belonged to a noble family which lived in ...
Ratio Studiorum

Ratio Studiorum

The term "Ratio Studiorum" is commonly used to designate the educational system of the Jesuits ; ...
Rationale

Rationale

Rational, an episcopal humeral, a counterpart of the pallium, and like it worn over the chasuble. ...
Rationalism

Rationalism

(Latin, ratio -- reason, the faculty of the mind which forms the ground of calculation, i.e. ...
Ratisbon

Ratisbon

DIOCESE OF RATISBON (RATISBONENSIS), also called REGENSBURG. Suffragan of Munich-Freising. It ...
Ratisbonne, Maria Alphonse

Maria Alphonse Ratisbonne

A converted Jew, born at Strasburg on 1 May, 1814; died at Ain Karim near Jerusalem, on 6 May, ...
Ratisbonne, Maria Theodor

Maria Theodor Ratisbonne

A distinguished preacher and writer, and director of the Archconfraternity of Christian Mothers, ...
Ratramnus

Ratramnus

(Rathramnus) A Benedictine monk at the Abbey of Corbie, in the present Department of Somme, ...
Ratzeburg, Ancient See of

Ratzeburg

(RACEBURGUM, RACEBURGENSIS.) In Germany, suffragan to Hamburg. The diocese embraced the ...
Ratzinger, Georg

Georg Ratzinger

Political economist and social reformer, b. at Rickering, near Deggendorf, in lower Bavaria, 3 ...
Rauscher

Joseph Othmar Rauscher

Prince- Archbishop of Vienna, born at Vienna, 6 Oct., 1797; died there 24 Nov., 1875. He ...
Ravalli, Antonio

Antonio Ravalli

Missionary, b. in Italy, 1811; d. at St. Mary's, Montana, U. S. A., 2 Oct., 1884. He entered ...
Ravenna

Ravenna

Archdiocese of Ravenna (Ravennatensis) The city of Ravenna is the capital of a province in ...
Ravesteyn, Josse

Josse Ravesteyn

Born about 1506, at Tielt, a small town in Flanders, hence often called T ILETANUS (J ODACUS ...
Ravignan, Gustave Xavier Lacroix de

Gustave Xavier Lacroix de Ravignan

French Jesuit, orator, and author, b. at Bayonne (Basses-Pyrénées), 1 Dec. 1795; ...
Rawes, Henry Augustus

Henry Augustus Rawes

Oblate of St. Charles, hymn-writer and preacher, b. at Easington near Durham, England, 11 Dec., ...
Raymbault, Charles

Charles Raymbault

Missionary, b. in France, 1602; entered the Society of Jesus at Rouen (1621); d. at Quebec, ...
Raymond IV, of Saint-Gilles

Raymond IV

Count of Toulouse and of Tripoli, b. about 1043; d. at Tripoli in 1105. He was the son of ...
Raymond Lully

Raymond Lully

(RAMON LULL) "Doctor Illuminatus", philosopher, poet, and theologian, b. at Palma in Majorca, ...
Raymond Martini

Raymond Martini

Dominican, theologian, Orientalist, b. at Subirats, Catalonia, c. 1220; d. after July, 1284. In ...
Raymond Nonnatus, Saint

St. Raymond Nonnatus

(In Spanish SAN RAMON). Born 1200 or 1204 at Portello in the Diocese of Urgel in Catalonia ...
Raymond of Peñafort, Saint

St. Raymond of Penafort

Born at Villafranca de Benadis, near Barcelona, in 1175; died at Barcelona, 6 January, 1275. He ...
Raymond of Sabunde

Raymond of Sabunde

(SABONDE, SEBON, SEBEYDE, etc.) Born at Barcelona, Spain, towards the end of the fourteenth ...
Raymond VI

Raymond VI

Count of Toulouse, b. 1156; d. 1222; succeeded his father, Raymond V, in 1195. He was a ...
Raymond VII

Raymond VII

Count of Toulouse, son of Raymond VI, b. at Beaucaire, 1197; d. at Milhaud, 1249; had espoused a ...
Raynaldi, Odorico

Odorico Raynaldi

Oratorian, b. at Treviso in 1595; d. at Rome, 22 January, 1671. Of patrician birth, he studied ...
Raynaud, Théophile

Theophile Raynaud

Theologian and writer, b. at Sospello near Nice, 15 Nov., 1583; d. at Lyons, 31 Oct., 1663. He ...
Raynouard, Françpois-Juste-Marie

Francois-Juste-Marie Raynouard

A French poet, dramatist, and philologist, b. at Brignoles, Var, 8 September, 1761; d. at Passy, ...
Reading Abbey

Reading Abbey

Reading Abbey in Surrey, England, was founded by Henry I in 1121, who built it, writes ...
Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist

The Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist

In this article we shall consider: the fact of the Real Presence , which is, indeed, the central ...
Realism, Nominalism, Conceptualism

Nominalism, Realism, Conceptualism

These terms are used to designate the theories that have been proposed as solutions of one of the ...
Reason

Reason

GENERAL MEANINGS Both in ordinary life and in philosophical discussions the term reason is of ...
Reason, Age of

Age of Reason

The name given to that period of human life at which persons are deemed to begin to be morally ...
Recanati and Loreto

Recanati and Loreto

DIOCESE OF RECANATI AND LORETO (RECINETENSIS) Province of Ancona, Central Italy, so called ...
Rechab and the Rechabites

Rechab and the Rechabites

Rechab was the father of Jonadab who in 2 Kings 10:15-28 , appears as a fervent supporter of ...
Recollection

Recollection

Recollection, as understood in respect to the spiritual life, means attention to the presence of ...
Reconciliation, Sacrament of

The Sacrament of Penance

Penance is a sacrament of the New Law instituted by Christ in which forgiveness of sins ...
Rector

Rector

(From the Latin regere , to rule). Priests who preside over missions or quasi- parishes ...
Rector Potens, Verax Deus

Rector Potens, Verax Deus

The daily hymn for Sext in the Roman Breviary finds its theme in the great heat and light of ...
Recusants, English

English Recusants

The first statute in which the term "Popish Recusants" is used is 35 Eliz. c. 2, "An Act for ...
Red Sea

Red Sea

(Hebrew Yâm-Sûph; Septuagint ‘e ’eruthrà thálassa; ...
Redeemer, Feast of the Most Holy

Feast of the Most Holy Redeemer

The feast is found only in the special calendar of some dioceses and religious orders, and ...
Redeemer, Knights of the

Knights of the Redeemer

A secular community founded in 1608 by the Duke of Mentone, Vincent Gonzaga, on the occasion of ...
Redemption

Redemption

The restoration of man from the bondage of sin to the liberty of the children of God ...
Redemption in the Old Testament

Redemption in the Old Testament

Redemption means either strictly deliverance by payment of a price or ransom, or simply ...
Redemptions, Penitential

Penitential Redemptions

Penitential redemptions are the substitution of exercises (especially alms-deeds), either easier ...
Redemptoristines

Redemptoristines

The cradle of the Redemptoristines is Scala, not far from Amalfi, Italy. Father Thomas Falcoia, of ...
Redemptorists

Redemptorists

(CONGREGATION OF THE MOST HOLY REDEEMER) A society of missionary priests founded by St. ...
Redford, Sebastion

Sebastian Redford

Born 27 April, 1701; died 2 January, 1763. Educated at St. Omer , Watten, and Liège, ...
Redi, Francesco

Francesco Redi

Italian poet, b. at Arezzo, 18 February, 1626; d. at Pisa 1 March, 1698. After taking his ...
Reding, Augustine

Augustine Reding

Prince-Abbot of Einsiedeln and theological writer, born at Lichtensteig, Switzerland, 10 ...
Reductions of Paraguay

Reductions of Paraguay

The Jesuit Reductions of Paraguay, one of the most singular and beautiful creations of Catholic ...
Referendarii

Referendarii

The papal office of the referendarii (from refero , to inform) existed at the Byzantine ...
Reform of a Religious Order

Reform of a Religious Order

Reform of a Religious Order, in the true sense of the word, is a return or bringing back of the ...
Reformation, The

The Reformation

The usual term for the religious movement which made its appearance in Western Europe in the ...
Reformed Churches

Reformed Churches

The name given to Protestant bodies which adopted the tenets of Zwingli and, later, the ...
Refuge, Cities of

Cities of Refuge

Towns which according to the Jewish law enjoyed the right of asylum and to which anyone who had ...
Refuge, Sisters of Our Lady of Charity of the

Sisters of Our Lady of Charity of the Refuge

The Institute of Our Lady of Charity was founded (1641) by [St. Jean] Eudes, at Caen, Normandy, ...
Regale, Droit de

Droit de Regale

( jus regaliœ, jus regale, jus deportus; German Regalienrecht ) Droit de Regale ...
Regalia

Regalia

According to the usage current in the British Isles the term regalia is almost always employed to ...
Regeneration

Regeneration

(Latin regeneratio ; Greek anagennesis and paliggenesia ). Regeneration is a ...
Regensburg

Ratisbon

DIOCESE OF RATISBON (RATISBONENSIS), also called REGENSBURG. Suffragan of Munich-Freising. It ...
Regesta, Papal

Papal Regesta

Papal Regesta are the copies, generally entered in special registry volumes, of the papal ...
Reggio dell' Emilia

Reggio Dell' Emilia

DIOCESE OF REGGIO DELL' EMILIA (REGINENSIS) Suffragan of Modena in central Italy. The city is ...
Reggio di Calabria

Reggio di Calabria

ARCHDIOCESE OF REGGIO DI CALABRIA (RHEGIENSIS). Archdiocese in Calabria, southern Italy. The ...
Regina

Regina

DIOCESE OF REGINA (REGINENSIS) A newly created (4 March, 1910) ecclesiastical division, ...
Regina Coeli

Regina Coeli (Queen of Heaven)

The opening words of the Eastertide anthem of the Blessed Virgin, the recitation of which is ...
Reginald of Piperno

Reginald of Piperno

Dominican, theologian, companion of St. Thomas Aquinas, b. at Piperno about 1230; d. about 1290. ...
Regino of Prüm

Regino of Prum

Date of birth unknown; d. at Trier in 915. According to the statements of a later era Regino was ...
Regionarii

Regionarii

The name given in later antiquity and the early Middle Ages to those clerics and officials of ...
Regis, John Francis, Saint

St. John Francis Regis

Born 31 January, 1597, in the village of Fontcouverte (department of Aude); died at la Louvesc, 30 ...
Registers, Parochial

Parochial Registers

One having the cure of souls is commanded by Divine precept to know his subjects (Conc. Trid., ...
Regnault, Henri Victor

Henri Victor Regnault

Chemist and physicist, b. at Aachen, 21 July, 1810; d. in Paris, 19 Jan., 1878. Being left an ...
Regulæ Juris

Regulae Juris

("Rules of Law") General rules or principles serving chiefly for the interpretation of laws. ...
Regulars

Regulars

( Latin regula, rule). The observance of the Rule of St. Benedict procured for the monks ...
Reichenau

Reichenau

Reichenau, called Augia Dives in medieval Latin manuscripts and possessing a once ...
Reichensperger, August

August Reichensberger

Politician and author, born at Coblenz, 22 March, 1808; died at Cologne, 16 July, 1895. He studied ...
Reichensperger, Peter

Peter Reichensberger

Jurist and parliamentarian, b. at Coblenz, 28 May, 1810; d. at Berlin, 31 December, 1892. He ...
Reifenstein

Reifenstein

A former Cistercian abbey in Eichsfeld, founded on 1 August, 1162 by Count Ernst of Tonna. It ...
Reiffenstuel, Johann Georg

Johann Georg Reiffenstuel

In religion A NACLETUS Theologian and canonist; b. at Kaltenbrunn (Tegernsee) 2 July, 1641; d. ...
Reims

Reims

ARCHDIOCESE OF REIMS (RHEMENSIS) The Archdiocese of Reims comprises the district of Reims in ...
Reims, Synods of

Synods of Reims

The first synod said to have been held at Reims by Archbishop Sonnatius between 624 and 630 ...
Reinmar of Hagenau

Reinmar of Hagenau

A German minnesinger of the twelfth century, surnamed in the manuscripts der Alte (the old) to ...
Reisach, Carl von

Carl von Reisach

Born at Roth, Bavaria, 7 July, 1800; died in the Redemptorist monastery of Contamine, France, ...
Reisch, Gregor

Gregor Reisch

Born at Balingen in Wurtemberg, about 1467; died at Freiburg, Baden, 9 May, 1525. In 1487 he ...
Relationship

Relationship

(CARNAL AND SPIRITUAL) The theologians understand by relationship in general a certain ...
Relatives, Duties of

Duties of Relatives

The general precept of charity obliging us to love our neighbour as ourselves is of course ...
Relativism

Relativism

Any doctrine which denies, universally or in regard to some restricted sphere of being, the ...
Relics

Relics

The word relics comes from the Latin reliquiae (the counterpart of the Greek leipsana ) ...
Religion

Religion

I. Derivation, Analysis, and Definition. II. Subjective Religion. III. Objective ...
Religion, Virtue of

Virtue of Religion

Of the three proposed derivations of the word "religion", that suggested by Lactantius and ...
Religions, Statistics of

Statistics of Religions

I. DEFINITION This study concerns itself with religious bodies, the number of their members, and ...
Religious Life

Religious Life

I. GENERAL VIEW AND EVANGELICAL IDEA OF THE RELIGIOUS LIFE A. GENERAL VIEW We all have within us ...
Religious Profession

Religious Profession

HISTORICAL VIEW Profession may be considered either as a declaration openly made, or as a state ...
Reliquaries

Reliquaries

It would follow of necessity from the data given in the article RELICS that ...
Remesiana

Remesiana

A titular see in Dacia Mediterranea, suffragan of Sardica. Remesiana is mentioned by the ...
Remigius of Auxerre

Remigius of Auxerre

A Benedictine monk, b. about the middle of the ninth century; d. 908. Remigius, or Remi, was a ...
Remigius, Saint

Saint Remigius

Apostle of the Franks, Archbishop of Reims, b. at Cerny or Laon, 437; d. at Reims, 13 January ...
Remiremont

Remiremont

Vosges, France, monastery and nunnery of the Rule of St. Benedict, founded by Sts. Romaricus ...
Remuzat, Ven. Anne-Madeleine

Anne-Madeleine Remuzat

Born at Marseilles, 29 Nov., 1696; died 15 Feb., 1730. At nine years of age she asked her parents ...
Remy, Abbey of Saint

Abbey of Saint Remy

Founded at Reims before 590. Its early history is very obscure; at first a little chapel ...
Renaissance, The

The Renaissance

The Renaissance may be considered in a general or a particular sense, as (1) the achievements of ...
Renaudot, Eusebius

Eusebius Renaudot

An apologetical writer and Orientalist, b. at Paris, 22 July, 1648; d. there, 1 Sept., 1720. He ...
Renaudot, Théophraste

Theophraste Renaudot

Born at Loudun, 1586; died at Paris, 25 October, 1653. Doctor of the medical faculty at ...
Reni, Guido

Guido Reni

Italian painter, b. at Calvenzano near Bologna, 4 Nov., 1575; d. at Bologna, 18 Aug. 1642. At one ...
Rennes

Rennes

(RHEDONENSIS) Rennes includes the Department of Ille et Vilaine. The Concordat of 1802 ...
Renty, Gaston Jean Baptiste de

Gaston Jean Baptiste de Renty

Born 1611 at the castle of Beni, Diocese of Bayeux in Normandy ; died 24 April, 1649. The only ...
Renunciation

Renunciation

( Latin renuntiare ). A canonical term signifying the resignation of an ecclesiastical ...
Reordinations

Reordinations

I. STATE OF THE QUESTION The Oratorian Jean Morin , in the seventeenth century, and Cardinal ...
Reparation

Reparation

Reparation is a theological concept closely connected with those of atonement and satisfaction, ...
Repington, Philip

Philip Repington

( Also Repyngdon). Cardinal-priest of the title of SS. Nereus and Achilleus, Bishop of ...
Repose, Altar of

Altar of Repose

(Sometimes called less properly sepulchre or tomb, more frequently repository). The altar ...
Reputation (as Property)

Reputation (As Property)

It is certain that a man is indefeasibly the owner of what he has been able to produce by his ...
Requiem, Masses of

Requiem Masses

Masses of Requiem will be treated under the following heads: I. Origins; II. Formulary ; III. ...
Rerum Crerator Optime

Rerum Creator Optime

The hymn for Matins of Wednesday in the Divine Office. It comprises four strophes of four ...
Rerum Deus Tenax Vigor

Rerum Deus Tenax Vigor

The daily hymn for None in the Roman Breviary, comprises (like the hymns for Terce and Sext ...
Rerum Novarum

Rerum Novarum

The opening words and the title of the Encyclical issued by Leo XIII, 15 May, 1891, on the ...
Rescripts, Papal

Papal Rescripts

( Latin re-scribere , "to write back") Rescripts are responses of the pope or a Sacred ...
Reservation

Reservation

The restriction in certain cases by a superior of the jurisdiction ordinarily exercised by an ...
Reserved Cases

Reserved Cases

A term used for sins whose absolution is not within the power of every confessor, but is ...
Residence, Ecclesiastical

Ecclesiastical Residence

A remaining or abiding where one's duties lie or where one's occupation is properly carried on, ...
Respicius, Tryphon, and Nympha

Tryphon, Respicius, and Nympha

Martyrs whose feast is observed in the Latin Church on 10 November. Tryphon is said to have ...
Respighi, Lorenzo

Lorenzo Respighi

Born at Cortemaggiore, Province of Piacenza, 7 October, 1824; died at Rome, 10 December, 1889. He ...
Responsorium

Responsorium

Responsory, or Respond, a series of verses and responses, usually taken from Holy Scripture and ...
Restitution

Restitution

Restitution has a special sense in moral theology. It signifies an act of commutative justice ...
Resurrection of Jesus Christ

Resurrection of Jesus Christ

Resurrection is the rising again from the dead, the resumption of life. In this article, we shall ...
Resurrection, General

General Resurrection

Resurrection is the rising again from the dead, the resumption of life. The Fourth Lateran ...
Rethel, Alfred

Alfred Rethel

Born at Aachen, 1816; died at Düsseldorf, 1859. He combined in a brilliant and forcible ...
Retreat of the Sacred Heart, Congregation of

Retreat of the Sacred Heart

(DAMES DE LA RETRAITE) Originally founded in 1678 under the name of the Institute of Retreat, ...
Retreats

Retreats

If we call a retreat a series of days passed in solitude and consecrated to practices of ...
Retz, Cardinal de

Cardinal de Retz

ARCHBISHOP OF PARIS Born at the Château of Montmirail, Oct., 1614; died in Paris, 24 ...
Reuben

Ruben (Reuben)

(REUBEN.) A proper name which designates in the Bible : (1) a patriarch; (II) a tribe of ...
Reuchlin, Johannes

Johannes Reuchlin

( Græcized , Capnion). Celebrated German humanist, b. at Pforzheim, Baden, 22 ...
Reumont, Alfred von

Alfred von Reumont

Statesman and historian, b. at Aachen, 15 August, 1808; d. there, 27 April, 1887. After finishing ...
Reusens, Edmond

Edmond Reusens

Archeologist and historian, b. at Wijneghem (Antwerp), 25 April, 1831; d. at Louvain, 25 Dec., ...
Reuss

Reuss

Name of the two smallest states of the German Confederation, which lie almost in the centre of ...
Revelation

Revelation

I. MEANING OF REVELATION Revelation may be defined as the communication of some truth by God ...
Revelation, Book of

Apocalypse

Apocalypse, from the verb apokalypto , to reveal, is the name given to the last book in the ...
Revelations, Private

Private Revelations

There are two kinds of revelations: (1) universal revelations, which are contained in the Bible ...
Revocation

Revocation

The act of recalling or annulling, the reversal of an act, the recalling of a grant, or the making ...
Revolution, English

English Revolution of 1688

James II, having reached the climax of his power after the successful suppression of Monmouth's ...
Revolution, French

French Revolution

The last thirty years have given us a new version of the history of the French Revolution, the ...
Rex Gloriose Martyrum

Rex Gloriose Martyrum

Rex Gloriose Martyrum, the hymn at Lauds in the Common of Martyrs (Commune plurimorum ...
Rex Sempiterne Cælitum

Rex Sempiterne Caelitum

The Roman Breviary hymn for Matins of Sundays and weekdays during the Paschal Time (from ...
Rey, Anthony

Anthony Rey

An educator and Mexican War chaplain, born at Lyons, 19 March, 1807; died near Ceralvo, Mexico, ...
Reynolds, William

William Reynolds

(RAINOLDS, RAYNOLDS, REGINALDUS) Born at Pinhorn near Exeter, about 1544; died at Antwerp, ...
Rhætia

Rhaetia

(RHÆTORUM). Prefecture Apostolic in Switzerland ; includes in general the district ...
Rhaphanæa

Rhaphanaea

A titular see in Syria Secunda, suffragan of Apamea. Rhaphanæa is mentioned in ancient ...
Rheinberger, Joseph Gabriel

Joseph Gabriel Rheinberger

A composer and organist, born at Vaduz, in the Principality of Lichtenstein, Bavaria, 17 March, ...
Rhenish Palatinate

Rhenish Palatinate

( German Rheinpfalz ). A former German electorate. It derives its name from the title of a ...
Rhesæna

Rhesaena

A titular see in Osrhoene, suffragan of Edessa. Rhesæna (numerous variations of the name ...
Rhinocolura

Rhinocolura

A titular see in Augustamnica Prima, suffragan of Pelusium. Rhinocolura or Rhinocorura was a ...
Rhithymna

Rhithymna

(RHETHYMNA) A titular see of Crete, suffragan of Gortyna, mentioned by Ptolemy, III, 15, ...
Rhizus

Rhizus

( Rizous .) A titular see of Pontus Polemoniacus suffragan of Neocæsarea, ...
Rho, Giacomo

Giacomo Rho

Missionary, born at Milan, 1593; died at Peking 27 April, 1638. He was the son of a noble and ...
Rhode Island

Rhode Island

The State of Rhode Island and xxyyyk.htm">Providence Plantations, one of the thirteen original ...
Rhodes

Rhodes

(RHODUS) A titular metropolitan of the Cyclades. It is an island opposite to Lycia and ...
Rhodes, Alexandre De

Alexandre de Rhodes

A missionary and author, born at Avignon, 15 March, 1591; died at Ispahan, Persia, 5 Nov., 1660. ...
Rhodesia

Rhodesia

A British possession in South Africa, bounded on the north and north-west by the Congo Free ...
Rhodiopolis

Rhodiopolis

A titular see of Lycia, suffragan of Myra, called Rhodia by Ptolemy (V, 3) and Stephanus ...
Rhodo

Rhodo

A Christian writer who flourished in the time of Commodus (180-92); he was a native of Asia ...
Rhosus

Rhosus

A titular see in Cilicia Secunda, suffragan to Anazarba. Rhosus or Rhossus was a seaport ...
Rhymed Bibles

Rhymed Bibles

The rhymed versions of the Bible are almost entirely collections of the psalms. The oldest ...
Rhythmical Office

Rhythmical Office

I. DESCRIPTION, DEVELOPMENT, AND DIVISION By rhythmical office is meant a liturgical horary ...
Ribadeneira, Pedro de

Pedro de Ribadeneira

(Or RIBADENEYRA and among Spaniards often RIVADENEIRA) Pedro De Ribadeneira was born at ...
Ribas, Andrés Pérez De

Andres Perez de Ribas

A pioneer missionary, historian of north-western Mexico; born at Cordova, Spain, 1576; died in ...
Ribe, Ancient See of, in Denmark (Jutland)

Ancient See of Ribe in Denmark (Jutland)

(RIPAE, RIPENSIS.) The diocese (29 deaneries, 278 parishes ) consisted of the modern ...
Ribeirao Preto

Preto Ribeirao

(DE RIBERAO PRETO) A suffragan see of the Archdiocese of São Paulo , Brazil, ...
Ribera, Jusepe de

Jusepe de Ribera

Called also SPAGNOLETTO, L'ESPAGNOLET (the little Spaniard) Painter born at Jativa, 12 Jan., ...
Ricardus Anglicus

Ricardus Anglicus

Ricardus Anglicus, Archdeacon of Bologna, was an English priest who was rector of the law ...
Riccardi, Nicholas

Nicholas Riccardi

A theologian, writer and preacher; born at Genoa, 1585; died at Rome, 30 May, 1639. Physically ...
Ricci, Lorenzo

Lorenzo Ricci

General of the Society of Jesus b. at Florence, 2 Aug., 1703; d. at the Castle of Sant' Angelo, ...
Ricci, Matteo

Matteo Ricci

Founder of the Catholic missions of China, b. at Macerata in the Papal States, 6 Oct. 1552; ...
Riccioli, Giovanni Battista

Giovanni Battista Riccioli

Italian astronomer, b. at Ferrara 17 April, 1598; d. at Bologna 25 June, 1671. He entered the ...
Rice, Edmund Ignatius

Edmund Ignatius Rice

Founder of the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools (better known as "Irish ...
Rich, St. Edmund

St. Edmund Rich

Archbishop of Canterbury, England, born 20 November, c. 1180, at Abingdon, six miles from ...
Richard

Richard (Franciscan Preacher)

A Friar minor and preacher, appearing in history between 1428 and 1431, whose origin and ...
Richard de Bury

Richard de Bury

Bishop and bibliophile, b. near Bury St. Edmund's, Suffolk, England, 24 Jan., 1286; d. at ...
Richard de la Vergne, François-Marie-Benjamin

Francois-Marie-Benjamin Richard de la Vergne

Archbishop of Paris, born at Nantes, 1 March, 1819; died in Paris, 28 January, 1908. ...
Richard de Wyche, Saint

St. Richard de Wyche

Bishop and confessor, b. about 1197 at Droitwich, Worcestershire, from which his surname is ...
Richard Fetherston, Blessed

Bl. Richard Fetherston

Priest and martyr ; died at Smithfield, 30 July, 1540. He was chaplain to Catharine of Aragon ...
Richard I, King Of England

Richard I, King of England

Richard I, born at Oxford, 6 Sept, 1157; died at Chaluz, France, 6 April, 1199; was known to ...
Richard of Cirencester

Richard of Cirencester

Chronicler, d. about 1400. He was the compiler of a chronicle from 447 to 1066, entitled "Speculum ...
Richard of Cornwall

Richard of Cornwall

(RICHARD RUFUS, RUYS, ROSSO, ROWSE). The dates of his birth and death are unknown, but he ...
Richard of Middletown

Richard of Middletown

(A MEDIA VILLA). Flourished at the end of the thirteenth century, but the dates of his birth ...
Richard of St. Victor

Richard of St. Victor

Theologian, native of Scotland, but the date and place of his birth are unknown; d. 1173 and ...
Richard Thirkeld, Blessed

Blessed Richard Thirkeld

Martyr ; b. at Coniscliffe, Durham, England ; d. at York, 29 May, 1583. From Queen's College, ...
Richard Whiting, Blessed

Blessed Richard Whiting

Last Abbot of Glastonbury and martyr, parentage and date of birth unknown, executed 15 Nov., ...
Richard, Charles-Louis

Charles-Louis Richard

Theologian and publicist; b. at Blainville-sur-l'Eau, in Lorraine, April, 1711; d. at Mons, ...
Richardson, Ven. William

Ven. William Richardson

( Alias Anderson.) Last martyr under Queen Elizabeth; b. according to Challoner at Vales in ...
Richelieu, Armand-Jean du Plessis, Duke de

Cardinal Richelieu

Cardinal ; French statesman, b. in Paris, 5 September, 1585; d. there 4 December 1642. At first ...
Richmond, Diocese of

Richmond

(RICHMONDENSIS.) Suffragan of Baltimore, established 11 July, 1820, comprises the State of ...
Ricoldo da Monte di Croce

Ricoldo Da Monte di Croce

(PENNINI.) Born at Florence about 1243; d. there 31 October, 1320. After studying in various ...
Riemenschneider, Tillmann

Riemenschneider

One of the most important of Frankish sculptors, b. at Osterode am Harz in or after 1460; d. at ...
Rienzi, Cola di

Cola di Rienzi

(i.e., NICOLA, son of Lorenzo) A popular tribune and extraordinary historical figure. His ...
Rieti

Rieti

(REATINA). Diocese in Central Italy, immediately subject to the Holy See. The city is ...
Rievaulx, Abbey of

Abbey of Rievaulx

(RIEVALL.) Thurston, Archbishop of York, was very anxious to have a monastery of the newly ...
Riffel, Caspar

Caspar Riffel

Historian, b. at Budesheim, Bingen, Germany, 19 Jan., 1807, d. at Mainz, 15 Dec., 1856. He ...
Rigby, John, Saint

St. John Rigby

English martyr ; b. about 1570 at Harrocks Hall, Eccleston, Lancashire; executed at St. Thomas ...
Rigby, Nicholas

Nicholas Rigby

Born 1800 at Walton near Preston, Lancashire; died at Ugthorpe, 7 September, 1886. At twelve years ...
Right

Right

Right, as a substantive (my right, his right), designates the object of justice. When a person ...
Right of Exclusion

Right of Exclusion

(Latin Jus Exclusivæ . The alleged competence of the more important Catholic ...
Right of Option

Right of Option

In canon law an option is a way of obtaining a benefice or a title, by the choice of the new ...
Right of Voluntary Association

Right of Voluntary Association

I. LEGAL RIGHT A voluntary association means any group of individuals freely united for the ...
Rimbert, Saint

St. Rimbert

Archbishop of Bremen - Hamburg, died at Bremen 11 June, 888. It is uncertain whether he was ...
Rimini

Rimini

DIOCESE OF RIMINI (ARIMINUM). Suffragan of Ravenna. Rimini is situated near the coast between ...
Rimini, Council of

Council of Rimini

The second Formula of Sirmium (357) stated the doctrine of the Anomoeans, or extreme Arians. ...
Rimouski

Rimouski

DIOCESE OF RIMOUSKI (SANCTI GERMANI DE RIMOUSKI) Suffragan of Quebec, comprises the counties of ...
Ring of the Fisherman, The

The Ring of Fisherman

The earliest mention of the Fisherman's ring worn by the popes is in a letter of Clement IV ...
Rings

Rings

Although the surviving ancient rings, proved by their devices, provenance, etc., to be of ...
Rinuccini, Giovanni Battista

Giovanni Battista Rinuccini

Born at Rome, 1592; d. at Fermo, 1653; was the son of a Florentine patrician, his mother being a ...
Rio Negro

Rio Negro

Prefecture Apostolic in Brazil, bounded on the south by a line running westwards from the ...
Rio, Alexis-François

Alexis-Francois Rio

French writer on art, b. on the Island of Arz, Department of Morbihan, 20 May, 1797; d. 17 June, ...
Riobamba

Riobamba

Diocese of (Bolivarensis), suffragan of Quito, Ecuador, erected by Pius IX, 5 January, 1863. ...
Rioja, Francisco de

Francisco de Rioja

A poet, born at Seville, 1583; died at Madrid, 1659. Rioja was a canon in the cathedral at ...
Ripalda, Juan Martínez de

Juan Martinez de Ripalda

Theologian, b. at Pamplona, Navarre, 1594; d. at Madrid, 26 April, 1648. He entered the Society ...
Ripatransone

Ripatransone

(RIPANENSIS). Diocese in Ascoli Piceno, Central Italy. The city is situated on five hills, ...
Ripon, Marquess of

Marquess of Ripon

George Frederick Samuel Robinson, K.G., P.C., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., Earl de Grey, Earl of Ripon, ...
Risby, Richard

Richard Risby

Born in the parish of St. Lawrence, Reading, 1489; executed at Tyburn, London, 20 April, 1534. ...
Rishanger, William

William Rishanger

Chronicler, b. at Rishangles, Suffolk, about ú d. after 1312. He became a Benedictine at ...
Rishton, Edward

Edward Rishton

Born in Lancashire, 1550; died at Sainte-Ménehould, Lorraine, 29 June, 1585. He was ...
Rita of Cascia, Saint

St. Rita of Cascia

Born at Rocca Porena in the Diocese of Spoleto , 1386; died at the Augustinian convent of ...
Rites

Rites

I. NAME AND DEFINITION Ritus in classical Latin in means primarily, the form and manner of any ...
Rites in the United States

Rites in the United States

Since immigration from the eastern portion of Europe and from Asia and Africa set in with ...
Ritschlianism

Ritschlianism

Ritschlianism is a peculiar conception of the nature and scope of Christianity, widely held in ...
Ritter, Joseph Ignatius

Joseph Ignatius Ritter

Historian, b. at Schweinitz, Silesia, 12 April, 1787; d. at Breslau, 5 Jan., 1857. He pursued his ...
Ritual

Ritual

The Ritual ( Rituale Romanum ) is one of the official books of the Roman Rite. It contains all ...
Ritualists

Ritualists

The word "Ritualists" is the term now most commonly employed to denote that advanced section of ...
Rivington, Luke

Luke Rivington

Born in London, May, 1838; died in London, 30 May, 1899; fourth son of Francis Rivington, a ...
Rizal, José Mercado

Jose Mercado Rizal

Filipino hero, physician, poet, novelist, and sculptor ; b. at Calamba, Province of La Laguna, ...
Robbers, Seven

Seven Robbers

(Septem Latrones), martyrs on the Island of Corcyra (Corfu) in the second century. Their ...
Robbia, Andrea della

Andrea Della Robbia

Nephew, pupil, assistant, and sharer of Luca's secrets, b. at Florence, 1431; d. 1528. It is ...
Robbia, Lucia di Simone

Lucia di Simone Robbia

Sculptor, b. at Florence, 1400; d. 1481. He is believed to have studied design with a goldsmith, ...
Robert Bellarmine, Saint

St. Robert Bellarmine

(Also, "Bellarmino"). A distinguished Jesuit theologian, writer, and cardinal, born at ...
Robert Johnson, Blessed

Bl. Robert Johnson

Born in Shropshire, entered the German College, Rome, 1 October, 1571. Ordained priest at ...
Robert of Arbrissel

Robert of Arbrissel

Itinerant preacher, founder of Fontevrault, b. c. 1047 at Arbrissel (now Arbressec) near ...
Robert of Courçon

Robert of Courcon

(DE CURSONE, DE CURSIM, CURSUS, ETC.). Cardinal, born at Kedleston, England ; died at ...
Robert of Geneva

Robert of Geneva

Antipope under the name of Clement VII, b. at Geneva, 1342; d. at Avignon, 16 Sept., 1394. He ...
Robert of Jumièges

Robert of Jumieges

Archbishop of Canterbury (1051-2). Robert Champart was a Norman monk of St. Ouen at Rouen ...
Robert of Luzarches

Robert of Luzarches

(LUS). Born at Luzarches near Pontoise towards the end of the twelfth century; is said to have ...
Robert of Melun

Robert of Melun

(DE MELDUNO; MELIDENSIS; MEIDUNUS). An English philosopher and theologian, b. in England ...
Robert of Molesme, Saint

St. Robert of Molesme

Born about the year 1029, at Champagne, France, of noble parents who bore the names of Thierry ...
Robert of Newminster, Saint

St. Robert of Newminster

Born in the district of Craven, Yorkshire, probably at the village of Gargrave; died 7 June, 1159. ...
Robert Pullus

Robert Pullus

(PULLEN, PULLAN, PULLY.) See also ROBERT PULLEN. Cardinal, English philosopher and ...
Robert, Saint

St. Robert

Founder of the Abbey of Chaise-Dieu in Auvergne, b. at Aurilac, Auvergne, about 1000; d. in ...
Roberts, Saint John

St. John Roberts

First Prior of St. Gregory's, Douai (now Downside Abbey ), b. 1575-6; martyred 10 ...
Robertson, James Burton

James Burton Robertson

Historian, b. in London 15 Nov., 1800; d. at Dublin 14 Feb., 1877, son of Thomas Robertson, a ...
Robinson, Venerable Christopher

Ven. Christopher Robinson

Born at Woodside, near Westward, Cumberland, date unknown; executed at Carlisle, 19 Aug., 1598. ...
Robinson, William Callyhan

William Callyhan Robinson

Jurist and educator, b. 26 July, 1834, at Norwich, Conn.; d. 6 Nov., 1911, at Washington, D.C. ...
Rocaberti, Juan Tomás de

Juan Tomas de Rocaberti

Theologian, b. of a noble family at Perelada, in Catalina, c. 1624; d. at Madrid 13 June, 1699. ...
Rocamadour

Rocamadour

Communal chief town of the canton of Gramat, district of Gourdon, Department of Lot, in the ...
Rocca, Angelo

Angelo Rocca

Founder of the Angelica Library at Rome, b. at Rocca, now Arecevia, near Ancone, 1545; d. at ...
Roch, Saint

St. Roch

Born at Montpellier towards 1295; died 1327. His father was governor of that city. At his birth ...
Rochambeau, Jean-Baptiste-Donatien

Rochambeau

Marshal, b. at Vendôme, France, 1 July, 1725; d. at Thoré, 10 May, 1807. At the age ...
Roche, Alanus de la

Alanus de Rupe (Alanus de la Roche)

( Sometimes DE LA ROCHE). Born about 1428; died at Zwolle in Holland, 8 September, 1475. ...
Rochester, Ancient See of

Rochester

(ROFFA; ROFFENSIS). The oldest and smallest of all the suffragan sees of Canterbury, was ...
Rochester, Blessed John

Bl. John Rochester

Priest and martyr, born probably at Terling, Essex, England, about 1498; died at York, 11 May, ...
Rochester, Diocese of

Rochester

This diocese, on its establishment by separation from the See of Buffalo, 24 January, 1868, ...
Rochet

Rochet

An over-tunic usually made of fine white linen (cambric; fine cotton material is also allowed), ...
Rochette, Désiré Raoul

Desire Raoul Rochette

Usually known as Raoul-Rochette, a French archeologist, b. at St. Amand (Cher), 9 March, 1789; d. ...
Rock, Daniel

Daniel Rock

Antiquarian and ecclesiologist, b. at Liverpool, 31 August, 1799; d. at Kensington, London, 28 ...
Rockford, Diocese of

Rockford

(ROCKFORDIENSIS). Created 23 September, 1908, comprises Jo Daviess, Stephenson, Winnebago, ...
Rockhampton

Rockhampton

Diocese in Queensland, Australia. In 1862 Father Duhig visited the infant settlement on the banks ...
Rococo Style

Rococo Style

This style received its name in the nineteenth century from French émigrés , who ...
Rodez

Rodez

(RUTHENAE) The Diocese of Rodez was united to the Diocese of Cahors by the Concordat of ...
Rodrigues Ferreira, Alexandre

Alexandre Rodrigues Ferreira

A Brazilian natural scientist and explorer, b. at Bahia in 1756; d. at Lisbon in 1815. He ...
Rodriguez, Alonso

Alonso Rodriguez

Born at Valladolid, Spain, 1526; died at Seville 21 February, 1616. When twenty years of age he ...
Rodriguez, Joao

Joao Rodriguez

(GIRAM, GIRAO, GIRON, ROIZ). Missionary and author, b. at Alcochete in the Diocese of Lisbon ...
Rodriguez, Saint Alphonsus

St. Alphonsus Rodriguez

(Also Alonso). Born at Segovia in Spain, 25 July, 1532; died at Majorca, 31 October, 1617. ...
Roe, Bartholomew

Bartholomew Roe

(VENERABLE ALBAN). English Benedictine martyr, b. in Suffolk, 1583; executed at Tyburn, 21 ...
Roermond

Roermond

(RUBAEMUNDENSIS). Diocese in Holland ; suffragan of Utrecht. It includes the Province of ...
Rogation Days

Rogation Days

Days of prayer, and formerly also of fasting, instituted by the Church to appease God's anger ...
Roger Bacon

Roger Bacon

Philosopher, surnamed D OCTOR M IRABILIS , b. at Ilchester, Somersetshire, about 1214; d. at ...
Roger Cadwallador, Venerable

Ven. Roger Cadwallador

English martyr, b. at Stretton Sugwas, near Hereford, in 1568; executed at Leominster, 27 Aug., ...
Roger of Wendover

Roger of Wendover

Benedictine monk, date of birth unknown; d. 1236, the first of the great chroniclers of St. ...
Roger, Bishop of Worcester

Roger, Bishop of Worcester

Died at Tours, 9 August, 1179. A younger son of Robert, Earl of Gloucester, he was educated ...
Roh, Peter

Peter Roh

Born at Conthey (Gunthis) in the canton of Valais ( French Switzerland ), 14 August, 1811; d. at ...
Rohault de Fleury

Rohault de Fleury

A family of French architects and archaeologists of the nineteenth century, of which the most ...
Rohrbacher, Réné François

Rene Francois Rohrbacher

Ecclesiastical historian, b. at Langatte (Langd) in the present Diocese of Metz, 27 September, ...
Rojas y Zorrilla, Francisco de

Francisco de Rojas y Zorrilla

Spanish dramatic poet, b. at Toledo, 4 Oct., 1607; d. 1680. Authentic information regarding the ...
Rokewode, John Gage

John Gage Rokewode

Born 13 Sept., 1786; died at Claughton Hall, Lancashire, 14 Oct., 1842. He was the fourth son of ...
Rolduc

Rolduc

(RODA DUCIS, also Roda, Closterroda or Hertogenrade). Located in S. E. Limburg, Netherlands. ...
Rolfus, Hermann

Hermann Rolfus

Catholic educationist, b. at Freiburg, 24 May, 1821; d. at Buhl, near Offenburg, 27 October, ...
Rolle de Hampole, Richard

Richard Rolle de Hampole

Solitary and writer, b. at Thornton, Yorkshire, about 1300; d. at Hampole, 29 Sept., 1349. The ...
Rollin, Charles

Charles Rollin

Born in Paris, 1661; died there, 1741. The son of a cutler, intended to follow his father's ...
Rolls Series

Rolls Series

A collection of historical materials of which the general scope is indicated by its official ...
Rolph, Thomas

Thomas Rolph

Surgeon, b. 1800; d. at Portsmouth, 17 Feb., 1858. He was a younger son of Dr. Thomas Rolph and ...
Roman Catacombs

Roman Catacombs

This subject will be treated under seven heads: I. Position; II. History; III. Inscriptions; IV. ...
Roman Catechism

Roman Catechism

This catechism differs from other summaries of Christian doctrine for the instruction of the ...
Roman Catholic

Roman Catholic

A qualification of the name Catholic commonly used in English-speaking countries by those ...
Roman Catholic Relief Bill

Roman Catholic Relief Bill

IN ENGLAND With the accession of Queen Elizabeth (1558) commenced the series of legislative ...
Roman Christian Cemeteries, Early

Early Roman Christian Cemeteries

This article treats briefly of the individual catacomb cemeteries in the vicinity of Rome. For ...
Roman Colleges

Roman Colleges

This article treats of the various colleges in Rome which have been founded under ...
Roman Congregations

The Roman Congregations

Certain departments have been organized by the Holy See at various times to assist it in the ...
Roman Curia

Roman Curia

Strictly speaking, the ensemble of departments or ministries which assist the sovereign pontiff ...
Roman Processional

Roman Processional

Strictly speaking it might be said that the Processional has no recognized place in the Roman ...
Roman Rite, The

The Roman Rite

( Ritus romanus ). The Roman Rite is the manner of celebrating the Holy Sacrifice, ...
Romanos Pontifices, Constitutio

Consitutio Romanos Pontifices

The restoration by Pius IX, 29 Sept. 1850, by letters Apostolic "Universalis ecclesiæ" of ...
Romanos, Saint

St. Romanos

Surnamed ho melodos and ho theorrhetor , poet of the sixth century. The only authority for ...
Romans, Epistle to the

Epistle To the Romans

This subject will be treated under the following heads: I. The Roman Church and St. Paul; II. ...
Romanus, Pope

Pope Romanus

Of this pope very little is known with certainty, not even the date of his birth nor the exact ...
Romanus, Saints

Saints Romanus

(1) A Roman martyr Romanus is mentioned in the "Liber Pontificalis" (ed. Duchesne, I, 155) ...
Rome

Rome

The significance of Rome lies primarily in the fact that it is the city of the pope. The Bishop ...
Rome, University of

University of Rome

The University of Rome must be distinguished from the "Studium Generale apud Curiam", established ...
Romero, Juan

Juan Romero

Missionary and Indian linguist, b. in the village of Machena, Andalusia, Spain, 1559; d. at ...
Romuald, Saint

St. Romuald

Born at Ravenna, probably about 950; died at Val-di-Castro, 19 June, 1027. St. Peter Damian, his ...
Romulus Augustulus

Romulus Augustulus

Deposed in the year 476, the last emperor of the Western Roman Empire. His reign was purely ...
Ronan, Saint

St. Ronan

There are twelve Irish saints bearing the name of Ronan commemorated in the "Martyrology of ...
Ronsard, Pierre de

Pierre de Ronsard

French poet, b. 2 (or 11) Sept., 1524, at the Château de la Poissonniere, near ...
Rood

Rood

(Anglo-Saxon Rod, or Rode, "cross"), a term, often used to signify the True Cross itself, ...
Roothaan, Johann Philipp

Johann Philipp Roothaan

Twenty-first General of the Society of Jesus , b. at Amsterdam, 23 November, 1785; d. at Rome, ...
Roper, William

William Roper

Biographer of St. Thomas More, born 1496; died 4 January, 1578. Both his father and mother ...
Rorate Coeli

Rorate Coeli

(Vulgate, text), the opening words of Isaiah 45:8 . The text is used frequently both at Mass and ...
Rosa, Salvatore

Salvatore Rosa

(Also spelled SALVATOR; otherwise known as RENNELLA, or ARENELLA, from the place of his birth). ...
Rosalia, Saint

St. Rosalia

Hermitess, greatly venerated at Palermo and in the whole of Sicily of which she in patroness. ...
Rosary, Breviary Hymns of the

Breviary Hymns of the Rosary

The proper office granted by Leo XIII (5 August, 1888) to the feast contains four hymns ...
Rosary, Confraternity of the

Confraternity of the Holy Rosary

In accordance with the conclusion of the article ROSARY no sufficient evidence is forthcoming to ...
Rosary, Feast of the Holy

Feast of the Holy Rosary

Apart from the signal defeat of the Albigensian heretics at the battle of Muret in 1213 which ...
Rosary, Seraphic

Franciscan Crown

( Or Seraphic Rosary.) A Rosary consisting of seven decades in commemoration of the seven ...
Rosary, The

The Rosary

Please see our How to Recite the Holy Rosary sheet in PDF format, and feel free to copy and ...
Rosate, Alberico de

Alberico de Rosate

(Or ROSCIATE). Jurist, date of birth unknown; died in 1354. He was bom in the village of ...
Roscelin

Roscelin

Roscelin, a monk of Compiègne, was teaching as early as 1087. He had contact with ...
Roscommon

Roscommon

Capital of County Roscommon, Ireland ; owes origin and name to a monastery founded by St. Coman ...
Rose of Lima, Saint

St. Rose of Lima

Virgin, patroness of America, born at Lima, Peru 20 April, 1586; died there 30 August, 1617. ...
Rose of Viterbo, Saint

St. Rose of Viterbo

Virgin, born at Viterbo, 1235; died 6 March, 1252. The chronology of her life must always remain ...
Rose Window

Rose Window

A circular window, with mullions and traceries generally radiating from the centre, and filled ...
Rosea

Rosea

A titular see. The official catalogue of the Roman Curia mentioned formerly a titular see of ...
Roseau

Roseau

(ROSENSIS). Diocese ; suffragan of Port of Spain, Trinidad, B.W.I. The different islands of ...
Rosecrans, William Starke

William Starke Rosecrans

William Born at Kingston, Ohio, U.S.A. 6 Sept., 1819; died near Redondo California, 11 March, ...
Roseline, Saint

St. Roseline

(Rossolina.) Born at Château of Arcs in eastern Provence, 1263; d. 17 January, 1329. ...
Rosenau

Rosenau

( Hungarian ROZSNYÓ; Latin ROSNAVIENSIS). Diocese in Hungary, suffragan of Eger, ...
Rosh Hashanah

Feast of Trumpets

The first day of Tishri (October), the seventh month of the Hebrew year. Two trumpets are ...
Rosicrucians

Rosicrucians

The original appelation of the alleged members of the occult-cabalistic- theosophic "Rosicrucian ...
Roskilde, Ancient See of, in Denmark

Ancient See of Roskilde in Denmark

(ROSCHILDIA, ROSKILDENSIS.) Suffragan to Hamburg, about 991-1104, to Lund, 1104-1536. The ...
Roskoványi, August

August Roskovanyi

Bishop of Neutra in Hungary, doctor of philosophy and theology, b. at Szenna in the County ...
Rosmini and Rosminianism

Rosmini and Rosminianism

Antonio Rosmini Serbati, philosopher, and founder of the Institute of Charity, born 24 March, ...
Rosminians

Rosminians

The Institute of Charity, or, officially, Societas a charitate nuncupata , is a religious ...
Ross

Ross

(ROSSENSIS). Diocese in Ireland. This see was founded by St. Fachtna, and the place-name ...
Ross, School of

School of Ross

The School of Ross &151; now called Ross-Carbery, but formerly Ross-Ailithir from the large ...
Rossano

Rossano

(ROSSANENSIS). Archdiocese in Calabria, province of Cosenza, Southern Italy. The city is ...
Rosselino, Antonio di Matteo di Domenico

Antonio di Matteo di Domenico Rosselino

The youngest of five brothers, sculptors and stone cutters, family name Gamberelli (1427-78). He ...
Rosselino, Bernardo

Bernardo Rosselino

(Properly BERNARDO DI MATTEO GAMBARELLI.) B. at Florence, 1409; d. 1464. Rosselino occupies ...
Rosselli, Cosimo

Cosimo Rosselli

(LORENZO DI FILIPPO). Italian fresco painter, b. at Florence, 1439; d. there in 1507. The ...
Rossi, Bernardo de

Bernardo de Rossi

(DE RUBEIS, GIOVANNI FRANCESCO BERNARDO MARIA). Theologian and historian; b. at Cividale del ...
Rossi, Giovanni Battista de

Giovanni Battista de Rossi

A distinguished Christian archaeologist , best known for his work in connection with the Roman ...
Rossi, Pellegrino

Pellegrino Rossi

Publicist, diplomat, economist, and statesman, b. at Carrara, Italy, 13 July, 1787; assassinated ...
Rossini, Gioacchino Antonio

Gioacchino Antonio Rossini

Born 29 February, 1792, at Pesaro in the Romagna; died 13 November, 1868, at Passy, near Paris. ...
Rostock, Sebastian von

Sebastian von Rostock

Bishop of Breslau, b. at Grottkau, Silesia, 24 Aug. 1607; d. at Breslau, 9 June, 1671. He ...
Rostock, University of

University of Rostock

Located in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, founded in the year 1419 through the united efforts of Dukes John ...
Roswitha

Hroswitha

A celebrated nun -poetess of the tenth century, whose name has been given in various forms, ...
Rota, Sacra Romana

Sacra Romana Rota

In the Constitution "Sapienti Consilio" (29 June, 1908), II, 2, Pins X re-established the Sacra ...
Roth, Heinrich

Heinrich Roth

Missionary in India and Sanskrit scholar, b. of illustrious parentage at Augsburg, 18 December, ...
Rothe, David

David Rothe

Bishop of Ossory ( Ireland ), b. at Kilkenny in 1573, of a distinguished family ; d. 20 ...
Rottenburg

Rottenburg

(ROTTENBURGENSIS). Diocese ; suffragan of the ecclesiastical Province of the Upper Rhine. It ...
Rotuli

Rotuli

Rotuli, i.e. rolls — in which a long narrow strip of papyrus or parchment, written on one ...
Rouen, Archdiocese of

Rouen

(ROTHOMAGENSIS) Revived by the Concordat of 1802 with the Sees of Bayeux, Evreux, and ...
Rouen, Synods of

Synods of Rouen

The first synod is generally believed to have been held by Archbishop Saint-Ouen about 650. ...
Rouquette, Adrien

Adrien Rouquette

Born in Louisiana in 1813, of French parentage; died as a missionary among the Choctaw Indians ...
Rousseau, Jean-Baptiste

Jean-Baptiste Rousseau

French poet, b. in Paris, 16 April 1670; d. at La Genette, near Brussels, 17 May, 1741. ...
Rovezzano, Benedetto da

Benedetto Da Rovezzano

Sculptor and architect, b. in 1490, either at Rovezzano, near Florence, or, according to some ...
Rowsham, Stephen

Stephen Rowsham

A native of Oxfordshire, entered Oriel College, Oxford, in 1572. He took orders in the English ...
Royal Declaration, The

The Royal Declaration

This is the name most commonly given to the solemn repudiation of Catholicity which, in ...
Royer-Collard, Pierre-Paul

Pierre-Paul Royer-Collard

Philosopher and French politician, b. at Sompuis (Marne), 21 June, 1763; d. at ...
Ruadhan, Saint

St. Ruadhan

One of the twelve "Apostles of Erin" ; died at the monastery of Lorrha, County Tipperary, ...
Ruben

Ruben (Reuben)

(REUBEN.) A proper name which designates in the Bible : (1) a patriarch; (II) a tribe of ...
Rubens, Peter Paul

Peter Paul Rubens

Eminent Flemish painter, b. at Siegen, Westphalia, 28 June, 1577; d. at Antwerp, 30 May, 1640. ...
Rubrics

Rubrics

I. IDEA Among the ancients, according to Columella, Vitruvius, and Pliny, the word rubrica , ...
Rubruck, William

William Rubruck

(Also called William of Rubruck and less correctly Ruysbrock, Ruysbroek, and Rubruquis), ...
Rudolf of Fulda

Rudolf of Fulda

Chronicler, d. at Fulda, 8 March, 862. In the monastery of Fulda Rudolf entered the ...
Rudolf of Habsburg

Rudolf of Habsburg

German king, b. 1 May 1218; d. at Speyer, 15 July, 1291. He was the son of Albert IV, the founder ...
Rudolf of Rüdesheim

Rudolf of Rudesheim

Bishop of Breslau, b. at Rüdesheim on the Rhine, about 1402; d. at Breslau in Jan., 1482. ...
Rudolf von Ems

Rudolf von Ems

[Hohenems in Austria ]. A Middle High German epic poet of the thirteenth century. Almost ...
Rueckers, Family of

Family of Rueckers

Famous organ and piano-forte builders of Antwerp. Hans Rueckers, the founder, lived in ...
Ruffini, Paolo

Paolo Ruffini

Physician and mathematician, b. at Valentano in the Duchy of Castro, 3 Sept., 1765; d. at Modena, ...
Rufford Abbey

Rufford Abbey

A monastery of the Cistercian Order, situated on the left bank of the Rainworth Water, about ...
Rufina, Saints

Sts. Rufina

The present Roman Martyrology records saints of this name on the following days: (1) On ...
Rufinus, Saint

Saints Rufinus

The present Roman Martyrology records eleven saints named Rufinus: (1) On 28 February, a ...
Rufus, Saint

Saints Rufus

The present Roman Martyrology records ten saints of this name. Historical mention is made of ...
Ruiz de Alarcón y Mendoza, Juan de

Juan de Ruiz de Alarcon y Mendoza

Spanish dramatic poet, b. at Mexico City, about 1580; d. at Madrid, 4 August, 1639. He received ...
Ruiz de Montoya, Antonio

Antonio Ruiz de Montoya

One of the most distinguished pioneers of the original Jesuit mission in Paraguay, and a ...
Ruiz de Montoya, Diego

Diego Ruiz de Montoya

Theologian, b. at Seville, 1562; d. there 15 March, 1632. He entered the Society of Jesus in ...
Rule of Faith, The

The Rule of Faith

The word rule ( Latin regula , Gr. kanon ) means a standard by which something can be ...
Rule of St. Augustine

Rule of St. Augustine

The title, Rule of Saint Augustine , has been applied to each of the following documents: ...
Rule of St. Benedict

Rule of St. Benedict

This work holds the first place among monastic legislative codes, and was by far the most ...
Rumania

Rumania

A kingdom in the Balkan Peninsula, situated between the Black Sea, the Danube, the Carpathian ...
Rumohr, Karl Friedrich

Karl Friedrich Rumohr

Art historian, b. at Dresden, 1785; d. there, 1843. He became a Catholic in 1804. He was ...
Rupe, Alanus de

Alanus de Rupe (Alanus de la Roche)

( Sometimes DE LA ROCHE). Born about 1428; died at Zwolle in Holland, 8 September, 1475. ...
Rupert, Saint

St. Rupert

(Alternative forms, Ruprecht, Hrodperht, Hrodpreht, Roudbertus, Rudbertus, Robert, Ruprecht). ...
Rusaddir

Rusaddir

A titular see of Mauritania Tingitana. Rusaddir is a Phoenician settlement whose name ...
Rusicade

Rusicade

A titular see of Numidia. It is mentioned by Ptolemy (IV, 3), Mela (I, 33), Pliny (V, 22), ...
Ruspe

Ruspe

Titular see of Byzacena in Africa, mentioned only by Ptolemy (IV, 3) and the "Tabula" of ...
Russell, Charles

Charles Russell

(BARON RUSSELL OF KILLOWEN). Born at Newry, Ireland, 10 November, 1832; died in London, 10 ...
Russell, Charles William

Charles William Russell

Born at Killough, Co. Down, 14 May, 1812; died at Dublin 26 Feb., 1880. He was descended from the ...
Russell, Richard

Richard Russell

Bishop of Vizéu in Portugal, b. in Berkshire, 1630; d. at Vizéu, 15 Nov., 1693. He ...
Russia

Russia

GEOGRAPHY Russia ( Rossiiskaia Imperiia; Russkoe Gosudarstvo ) comprises the greater part of ...
Russia, The Religion of

The Religion of Russia

A. The Origin of Russian Christianity There are two theories in regard to the early Christianity ...
Russian Language and Literature

Russian Language and Literature

The subject will be treated under the following heads, viz. RUSSIAN LANGUAGE; ANCIENT POPULAR ...
Rusticus of Narbonne, Saint

St. Rusticus of Narbonne

Born either at Marseilles or at Narbonnaise, Gaul; died 26 Oct., 461. According to biographers, ...
Ruth, Book of

Book of Ruth

One of the proto-canonical writings of the Old Testament, which derives its name from the heroine ...
Ruthenian Rite

Ruthenian Rite

There is, properly speaking, no separate and distinct rite for the Ruthenians, but inasmuch as ...
Ruthenians

Ruthenians

(Ruthenian and Russian: Rusin , plural Rusini ) A Slavic people from Southern Russia, ...
Rutter, Henry

Henry Rutter

( vere BANISTER) Born 26 Feb., 1755; died 17 September, 1838, near Dodding Green, ...
Ruvo and Bitonto

Ruvo and Bitonto

(RUBENSIS ET BITUNTINENSIS) Diocese in the Province of Bari, Aquileia, Southern Italy. Ruvo, ...
Ruysbroeck, Blessed John

Blessed John Ruysbroeck

Surnamed the Admirable Doctor, and the Divine Doctor, undoubtedly the foremost of the Flemish ...
Ruysch, John

John Ruysch

Astronomer, cartographer, and painter, born at Utrecht about 1460; died at Cologne, 1533. Little ...
Ryan, Father Abram J.

Father Abram J. Ryan

The poet-priest of the South, born at Norfolk, Virginia, 15 August, 1839; died at Louisville, ...
Ryan, Patrick John

Patrick John Ryan

Sixth Bishop and second Archbishop of Philadelphia, b. At Thurles, County Tipperary, ...
Ryder, Henry Ignatius Dudley

Henry Ignatius Dudley Ryder

English Oratorian priest and controversialist, b. 3 Jan., 1837; d. at Edgbaston, Birmingham, 7 ...
Ryken, Theodore James

Theodore James Ryken

Known as B ROTHER F RANCIS X AVIER , founder of the Xaverian Brothers. Born at Elshout, ...

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