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'Remember Me' - Should Catholics talk to their dead loved ones?

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By (CNA/EWTN)
8/19/2019 (1 month ago)
Catholic Online (https://www.catholic.org)

In the 2017 Disney-Pixar movie "Coco," the main character, Miguel, accidentally passes over into the land of the dead on Dia De Los Muertos (Day of the Dead) while trying to reconcile his love of music with his family's ban on it.

Highlights

By (CNA/EWTN)
Catholic Online (https://www.catholic.org)
8/19/2019 (1 month ago)

Published in U.S.


Denver, Colo., (CNA) - There, he learns that the dead can only visit their loved ones on that holiday if they can prove there is a photo of them on their family's "ofrenda", an altar with photos of loved ones, colorful decorations, and the favorite foods, drinks and mementos of the deceased.

"We've put their photos on the ofrenda so their spirits can cross over. That is very important! If we don't put them up, they can't come!" Miguel's abuelita explains.

While in the land of the dead, Miguel bumps into his own deceased family members, and learns his true family history.

Though Miguel's experience is fictional, it is not uncommon for grieving loved ones to experience what psychologists call "After Death Communication," in which the bereaved believe that they see, hear the voices of, or even smell their dead loved ones.

These experiences, sometimes called "bereavement hallucinations," can be healing and comforting for those who grieve, multiple studies have found.

But Catholics should proceed with caution when "communicating" with the dead, two Catholic psychologists told CNA, and they should ground their communications in prayer.

Dana Nygaard is a Catholic and a licensed professional counselor who speaks to grief groups and counsels clients through loss. Nygaard told CNA that because many Catholics misunderstand what happens to souls after death, she urges caution when talking about what it means to talk to dead loved ones.

"If they're speaking to a loved one, how are they doing that? Is it through saying, 'Hey grandma, I think you're up there in heaven with God. I really hope you pray and look over me.' Okay, well that sounds fine," she said.

"Or...are they going to a psychic or a medium? Is this necromancy? How were they doing this?  I think that's an important question," Nygaard said.

According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, "all forms of divination are to be rejected" which includes the "conjuring up the dead."

However, the Church encourages Catholics to pray for the dead as one of the spiritual works of mercy.

"From the beginning the Church has honored the memory of the dead and offered prayers in suffrage for them, above all the Eucharistic sacrifice, so that, thus purified, they may attain the beatific vision of God. The Church also commends almsgiving, indulgences, and works of penance undertaken on behalf of the dead," the Catechism states.

"Let us not hesitate to help those who have died and to offer our prayers for them."

"Prayer, prayer, prayer," Nygaard said, noting that because Catholics do not know the state of the souls of their loved ones when they die, it is important to pray for them after their death, as prayers can help the souls in purgatory get to heaven faster.

The Liturgy of the Hours, a set of prayers said periodically throughout the day by priests, religious and some lay Catholics, includes a special Office of the Dead, a set of prayers said specifically for those who have died.

Nygaard told CNA that she often encourages Catholics who are grieving a loss to ask for the intercessory prayers of saints already canonized by the Church, which means that they are assured to be with God in heaven.

"Maybe it was that my great-grandmother was really close to St. Anne. I'm going to ask St. Anne, 'Would you please look after my sweet great grandmother? I pray she's there with you in heaven.' I've known people also to pray, 'God, I'm asking you, do I need to keep praying for my father?'" she said.

Nygaard said that those she counsels through grief will sometimes, after a period of prayer, feel a deep sense of peace that their loved one is in heaven.

Dr. Chris Stravitsch is a licensed professional counselor and marriage and family therapist, as well as the president and founder of Rejoice Counseling Apostolate, a group of Catholic counselors. Stravitsch told CNA that in addition to prayer, he counsels his clients to prepare for their first year of grief, which can often be the most difficult.

"There are a lot of 'firsts' to pass through: the first Christmas without him or her; their first birthday without them present; the first wedding anniversary alone; etc. I counsel people to prepare for these occasions in advance because we know it will be painful and difficult," he said.

He said he tells his clients to plan in advance how and with whom they will spend these difficult days, and how they will remember their loved ones at those times.

"It's helpful to surround yourself with other loved ones who understand your loss, while also setting aside a little time to be alone in prayer and reminiscing," he said.

"These are meaningful days to attend Mass, so that you can cling to Christ and receive His consolation. Visiting the gravesite or a place where you have a special memory can also be meaningful, whether that is done alone or with the support of others," he said.

"Furthermore, be sure to tell stories and talk about your deceased loved ones," he added. "We need to continue coming together at various times to remember them in a spirit of love and prayer. This is a balm for the brokenhearted."

Stravitsch said it is important for Catholics to remember that death and grief are painful things to experience, and that Jesus himself wept at the death of his friend Lazarus.

"(Jesus) wants to be with us and share our grief," he said. This means Catholics should be sensitive towards those who are grieving, and avoid well-intentioned but unhelpful comments such as: "It was God's will"; "It was their time to go"; "They're in a better place now"; or "There's a reason for everything"; Stravitsch said.

"Simply saying, 'I'm sorry', giving a warm embrace, sharing a tear, and remaining at their side as long as needed can be far more consoling," he said.

Checking back in after the funeral has passed, and continuing to talk about the deceased with those who are grieving are other ways Catholics can show compassion, he said.

Both Nygaard and Stravitsch said that they have found that clients are usually deeply comforted by the Church's teaching on the communion of saints and the promise of everlasting life for all souls who are united with God.

"In the Catholic Church, like we have the mystical body of Christ. And we know that the souls in heaven are surrounding the altar during communion," she said.

"What I have found is that normally brings a great sense of peace," to the bereaved, she said. "It's not just me sitting there when I go up for communion...we're mystically connected and that we can ask for the intercession of the saints," which means any soul that is in heaven with God.

In his Letter to the Hebrews, St. Paul recalls those already in heaven, and says that the faithful are surrounded "by so great a cloud of witnesses."

"When the Lord comes in glory, and all his angels with him, death will be no more and all things will be subject to him. But at the present time some of his disciples are pilgrims on earth. Others have died and are being purified, while still others are in glory, contemplating 'in full light, God himself triune and one, exactly as he is.' All of us, however, in varying degrees and in different ways share in the same charity towards God and our neighbors, and we all sing the one hymn of glory to our God. All, indeed, who are of Christ and who have his Spirit form one Church and in Christ cleave together,'" the Catechism states.

These teachings are a "great consolation for the bereaved," Stravitsch said. 

"Not only is there the hope of being reunited with our loved ones after death, but there is the reality of remaining mysteriously connected with them even today. Whether we are interceding for them as we pray for the repose of their soul or we are asking for their prayers, there is a sense that we are within reach of one another," he added.

"The bonds of true love are not destroyed in death but are made ever stronger. The Church recognizes this in a unique way when we celebrate All Souls Day and we call to mind our deceased loved ones. We are united in Christ."


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