Skip to content
Deacon Keith Fournier Hi reader, it seems you use Catholic Online a lot; that's great! It's a little awkward to ask, but we need your help. If you have already donated, we sincerely thank you. We're not salespeople, but we depend on donations averaging $14.76 and fewer than 1% of readers give. If you donate just $5.00, the price of your coffee, Catholic Online School could keep thriving. Thank you. Help Now >

Quakes, fires, hurricanes and now war? North Korea pledges to attack the USA if new sanctions pass

Free World Class Education
FREE Catholic Classes

By Marshall Connolly (CALIFORNIA NETWORK)
9/11/2017 (2 years ago)
Catholic Online (https://www.catholic.org)

China and Russia appear prepared to agree to new sanctions on North Korea.

North Korea is threatening war, again, should the UN pass the harshest sanctions yet to punish the country for its latest nuclear test. North Korea continues to defy UN resolutions and pressure from the international community in pursuit of missiles that can deliver nuclear weapons to the United States.

How will North Korea respond to new sanctions?

How will North Korea respond to new sanctions?

Highlights

By Marshall Connolly (CALIFORNIA NETWORK)
Catholic Online (https://www.catholic.org)
9/11/2017 (2 years ago)

Published in Asia Pacific

Keywords: North Korea, sanctions, UN, China, Russia, US, USA, war, nuclear


LOS ANGELES, CA (California Network) -- North Korea is threatening the U.S. will pay a "due price" if the UN passes the most severe sanctions ever faced by the rogue state.

"The DPRK is ready and willing to use any form of ultimate means... The forthcoming measures to be taken by the DPRK will cause the US the greatest pain and suffering it had[sic] ever gone though in its entire history."


The U.S. has called for sanctions that would virtually end all trade with North Korea and freeze all assets controlled by the regime. However, China and Russia refused to accept the initial U.S. proposal and have agreed to a more limited set of sanctions. Still, with Russia and China on board with tightening the sanctions, North Korea will be hit with additional restrictions.

The question next becomes how North Korea will respond. Will they stage a military attack? It's unlikely, but possible.

The U.S. has signaled its impatience with the UN process of talks and sanctions which appear to have done nothing to curtail the pace of North Korea's weapons development program. In fact, that program appears to have accelerated.

The speech delivered by Ambassador Nikki Haley calling for sanctions also suggested this is the end of American patience with North Korea and the international sanctions process. Haley made clear that no talks or sanctions have worked to halt the regime's nuclear program.

North Korea is betting that the United States will not stage a preemptive attack, and that if the U.S. made such an attack, China would come to its aid. Experts agree, the U.S. cannot stage such an attack because the risk of Chinese intervention is significant, and the North can also inflict severe casualties on South Korean civilians living within range of their artillery. For these reasons, a diplomatic solution is preferred.

Conversely, the U.S. must deal with the bellicose rhetoric from North Korea which routinely threatens to strike the United States.

Ultimately, the United States has incredible military capability and can destroy North Korea, and can even block a Chinese military response, if necessary. Naturally, China does not want conflict with the United States, which is the country's largest trading partner, so it's unclear if China would actually risk conflict with the United States.

The UN seems to have got the message that the U.S. is out of patience. It is likely the new sanctions will pass. What happens next is up to North Korea. If North Korea stages a military provocation, anything could happen. If the North continues to develop its program, the U.S. will have a case for war. Ultimately, China and Russia will have to decide if they want to stay aligned to North Korea, a nation that offers little value except as a buffer against U.S. hegemony, or if they want to maintain amicable relations with the world's largest superpower.


Comments


More Asia Pacific

Anything that threatens Communism is a target, Chinese human rights advocate says Watch

Image of

A Chinese human rights activist and former political prisoner has called for renewed focus on the country's practices of mass detention, ... continue reading


Macau diocese angered by government light show on church ruins Watch

Image of Ruins of St. Pauls

A diocese in southern China expressed disappointment Wednesday regarding a patriotic light-show that had been projected on the remains of a ... continue reading



Burmese cardinal laments religious leaders' silence over violence Watch

Image of Cardinal Charles Maung Bo of Yangon

Cardinal Charles Maung Bo of Yangon has decried Burma's ongoing violence, and encouraged religious leaders to raise their voices in defense ... continue reading


China marks 70 years of communism and human rights abuses Watch

Image of China

On Tuesday, the People's Republic of China marked the 70th anniversary of the founding of the country's communist regime. While some world ... continue reading


At Vatican, Secretary Mike Pompeo highlights Chinese religious freedom violations Watch

Image of Secretary Pompeo

U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo spoke out Wednesday about China's religious freedom violations during a visit to the Vatican. ... continue reading


Never Miss any Updates!

Stay up to date with the latest news, information, and special offers.

Catholic Online Logo

Copyright 2019 Catholic Online. All materials contained on this site, whether written, audible or visual are the exclusive property of Catholic Online and are protected under U.S. and International copyright laws, © Copyright 2019 Catholic Online. Any unauthorized use, without prior written consent of Catholic Online is strictly forbidden and prohibited.

Catholic Online is a Project of Your Catholic Voice Foundation, a Not-for-Profit Corporation. Your Catholic Voice Foundation has been granted a recognition of tax exemption under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Federal Tax Identification Number: 81-0596847. Your gift is tax-deductible as allowed by law.