Skip to content

In India, you can buy a bride for as little as $100 USD -- and nobody will care.

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
3/26/2014 (4 years ago)
Catholic Online (https://www.catholic.org)

The plight of trafficked brides is barely coming to public attention.

India is a place where anyone can buy a wife for as little as a hundred dollars. The "wives" are trafficked as girls and sold into slavery, often by their own parents. An entire business model has developed around the practice which has become even more common as demand for labor increases.

Bought and sold, this woman and her child have a bleak future. And nobody is coming to the rescue.

Bought and sold, this woman and her child have a bleak future. And nobody is coming to the rescue.

Highlights

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
Catholic Online (https://www.catholic.org)
3/26/2014 (4 years ago)

Published in Asia Pacific

Keywords: human trafficking, india, brides, slavery, abuse, human rights


LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - Trafficked brides in India are a major problem, and a problem that officials are entirely unwilling to admit even exists, furthermore address. For anywhere between $300 to $100 USD, a young girl, between the ages of 14-21 can be purchased from her family and kept or sold.

Typically families in rural districts will sell their daughters when faced with economic hardship. Those girls are often sold to "matchmakers" who are supposed to find the girls good husbands. Instead, they are human traffickers who have little regard for their victims.

Light a candle for all the victims of human trafficking.

Girls are usually taken to urban areas where they are sold to other middlemen or to "husbands." Along the way, it is customary for the girls to be raped.

Once sold to their husbands, they are used as domestic labor and as sexual objects. They frequently work long hours and if they become pregnant, their children are given a second-rate status.

Eventually the women are sold as they become older. A typical trafficked bride may be sold three or four times before she is finally sold to someone for the last time. Usually her final buyer is someone who is crippled or disfigured. Her price goes down with each sale.

Wealthier men have an incentive to engage in this practice. For an initial investment of just a few hundred or less, they get free labor, sex, and can sell each woman to recover part of the price.

Police and other officials deny the problem even exists, leaving women with no place to go to escape the cycle. They must simply accept their fate.

Such practices have existed since antiquity, but a modern emphasis on the economics of the practice and the use of technology allows more efficient trafficking. That means more trafficking. In most cases, the women are sold by their families, but in rare cases they can be tricked into the system, or even kidnapped.

For now, there is little the outside world can do, beyond insist that authorities in India change they way they view and treat women. There is a movement underway to improve the rights and condition of women in India, but like all suffrage movements it will take a long time to come to fruition.

The very culture must be changed. Women cannot be viewed as a commodity, bought and paid for, but rather as sovereign human beings with the very same rights as men. Differences in DNA should not confer different rights, or less rights. We have a duty to shine a spotlight on these evils and to dispel the darkness with awareness and opposition.

---


'Help Give every Student and Teacher FREE resources for a world-class Moral Catholic Education'


Copyright 2018 - Distributed by THE CALIFORNIA NETWORK

Pope Francis Prayer Intentions for APRIL 2018
For those who have Responsibility in Economic Matters.
That economists may have the courage to reject any economy of exclusion and know how to open new paths.


Comments


More Asia Pacific

Solved? Forensic evidence offers clue to Amelia Earhart's disappearence Watch

Image of The mystery of Amelia Earhart's disappearance may be solved.

Amelia Earhart disappeared in 1936 during an attempt to circumnavigate the globe by air. Accompanying her was her navigator, Fred ... continue reading


Catholic Church in China continues to grow despite persecution Watch

Image of The Catholic Church in China continues to grow.

Nearly 50,000 people in China were baptized into the Catholic Church in 2017, according to a report by Fides.  LOS ANGELES, CA ... continue reading


The aftermath of China's 'one child' policy is worse than we know Watch

Image of China's 'one child' policy has created demand for sex trafficking, among other problems.

Although China expanded its former one child policy to a limit of two children per family in 2015, decades of government-enforced ... continue reading


Christian persecution on the rise in India Watch

Image of Christian persecution in India is on the rise.

Compared to 2016, attacks against Christians in India by Hindu extremists more than doubled in 2017 amid efforts to label the religious ... continue reading


Living in darkness no more: India to connect last 240 million people to electricity Watch

Image of For millions of children, studying at night is dangerous. A single kerosene lamp knocked over can burn down a house in seconds. Electricity will make life safer and improve educational outcomes for millions, especially girls.

Two hundred, forty million people in India go to bed with the sun because they still lack electricity. That may change soon as the ... continue reading


Never Miss any Updates!

Stay up to date with the latest news, information, and special offers.

Information
Learn about Catholic world

Catholic Online
Inform - Inspire - Ignite

Catholic Online Saints
Your saints explained

Catholic Online Prayers
Prayers for every need

Catholic Online Bible
Complete bible online

Catholic Online News
Your news Catholic eye

Daily Reading
Today's bible reading

Lent / Easter
Death & resurrection of Jesus

Advent / Christmas
Birth of Jesus

Rest of Catholic Online
All Catholic world we offer

Services
Products and services we offer

Catholic Online Shopping
Catholic medals, gifts & books

The California Network
Inspiring streaming service

Advertise on Catholic Online
Your ads on catholic.org

Catholic Online Email
Email with Catholic feel

Catholic Online Singles
Safe, secure Catholic dating

The California Studios
World-class post production service

Education
Learn the Catholic way

Catholic Online School
Free Catholic education for all

Student Classes
K-12 & Adult Education Classes

School Teachers
Teacher lesson plans & resources

Support Free Education
Tax deductible support Free education

Socials
Connect with us online

Catholic Online on Facebook
Catholic social network

Catholic Online on Twitter
Catholic Tweets

Catholic Online on YouTube
Enjoy our videos

Catholic Online on Instagram
Shared Catholic moments

Catholic Online on Pinterest
Catholic ideas style inspiration

Catholic Online Logo

Copyright 2018 Catholic Online. All materials contained on this site, whether written, audible or visual are the exclusive property of Catholic Online and are protected under U.S. and International copyright laws, © Copyright 2018 Catholic Online. Any unauthorized use, without prior written consent of Catholic Online is strictly forbidden and prohibited.