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Singer Natalie Cole, daughter of Nat King Cole, dies at 65

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Cole underwent substance abuse issues to rebuild life, career

The daughter of American Standards-singer Nat King Cole, Natalie Cole, would forge her own inimitable musical career . and then later in life would give musical homage to her father has died at the age of 65. Plagued by substance abuse and kidney failure, Cole would give the world such hits as "This Will Be" and "Our Love."

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Cole had longed declined to perform her father's works in concert. 'Unforgettable . with Love' won six Grammys, including the big three: song of the year, record of the year and album of the year.

Cole had longed declined to perform her father's works in concert. "Unforgettable . with Love" won six Grammys, including the big three: song of the year, record of the year and album of the year.

Highlights

By Catholic Online (CALIFORNIA NETWORK)
CALIFORNIA NETWORK (https://www.youtube.com/c/californianetwork)
1/3/2016 (4 years ago)

Published in Celebrity

Keywords: Natalie Cole, Nat King Cole, singer, Unforgettable, death


LOS ANGELES, CA (California Network) - Born in 1950, Cole had a somewhat rarified life, growing up with the entertainment world's A-listers. Her father, one of the most accomplished singers and jazz musicians of the postwar era, and her mother Maria Hawkins Cole, a singer for Duke Ellington grew up in Los Angeles' upscale Hancock Park neighborhood.

"I remember meeting Peggy Lee, Danny Thomas, Lena Horne, Dorothy Dandridge, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong and so many others at parties," she told reporters in 2014.


Cole first sang with her father on a Christmas album, at the age of six. Performing by the time she was 11, her father died in 1965, when she was only 15, a loss that "crushed" her. "Dad had been everything to me," she told the WSJ.

Cole embarked on her musical career following college. The single "This Will Be" from her album "Inseparable" was a massive hit in 1975. The album won her a Grammy for best new artist.

Other hits followed, including "I've Got Love on My Mind," "Our Love" and "Someone That I Used to Love."


Hard drug abuse coupled with waning popularity sidetracked both her personal and professional life. Cole admitted to abusing both cocaine and heroin, and her mother filed for conservatorship in 1982.

Undergoing rehab in 1983, there was a marked difference in the transformed Cole. "Somehow, at some point halfway through those 30 days, I went from not wanting to be there to being afraid to leave. I was starting to get it," she said.

Cole returned to music with great success in the late 1980s. "Unforgettable . With Love," a 1991 album that included a duet with her father on one of his biggest hits, "Unforgettable," was made possible with then current technology.

Cole had longed declined to perform her father's works in concert. "Unforgettable . with Love" won six Grammys, including the big three: song of the year, record of the year and album of the year.

She won another Grammy for 2008's "Still Unforgettable," which included a variety of American standards.

It was at that time that Cole began suffering from kidney problems due to hepatitis C, which she attributed to her past drug issues. Both kidneys failed, and in 2009, she went public with a request for a kidney donation.

She received a directed donation of a kidney from a deceased donor in May 2009.

Natalie Cole was married three times, divorcing her third husband, Kenneth Dupree, in 2004.

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