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'Amazing Race' winning Catholic siblings prize family over jackpot

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By Sister Eileen Connelly
2/8/2006 (1 decade ago)
Catholic News Service (www.catholicnews.com)

CINCINNATI, Ohio - The Linz siblings, who emerged as the winners of the CBS series "The Amazing Race" in December, credit a Catholic school background with their knowledge of geography and their use of teamwork.

’AMAZING’ SIBLINGS CREDIT CATHOLIC EDUCATION – The Linz siblings credit their Catholic school background for their winning the CBS series 'The Amazing Race.' Pictured from left to right are Tommy, Megan, Alex and Nick Linz. The Cincinnati siblings said the geography and teamwork they learned in grade school helped them compete in the worldwide adventure. (CNS photo/CBS)

’AMAZING’ SIBLINGS CREDIT CATHOLIC EDUCATION – The Linz siblings credit their Catholic school background for their winning the CBS series "The Amazing Race." Pictured from left to right are Tommy, Megan, Alex and Nick Linz. The Cincinnati siblings said the geography and teamwork they learned in grade school helped them compete in the worldwide adventure. (CNS photo/CBS)

Highlights

By Sister Eileen Connelly
Catholic News Service (www.catholicnews.com)
2/8/2006 (1 decade ago)

Published in Marriage & Family


The Linzes - Nick, 25; Alex, 23; Megan, 21; and Tommy, 20 - were the first team to cross the finish line near Niagara Falls, N.Y., netting a $1 million prize. Since the show's finale, the siblings have been busy with interviews and public appearances, including a visit to Immaculate Heart of Mary School (IHM) here, where they all attended grade school. They received an enthusiastic welcome from the faculty and students as they recounted some of their experiences. Alex Linz, a 2000 graduate of St. Xavier High School who currently works as an emergency department technician at Mercy Hospital Anderson, credited the education they received and the values they learned at the school with helping them to win the competition. "Our teachers at IHM always taught us to use teamwork," he told The Catholic Telegraph, the official publication of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. "They always encouraged us and were role models. I owe the person that I am today to them." "I was fortunate enough to have taught all the Linz children," said Brother Ed Kesler, a Brother of St. Francis of the Poor and assistant principal at the school. "While here, they all displayed the team spirit and quick thinking that was evident during 'The Amazing Race' challenge. "What a blessing it is as a Catholic educator to see such strong character and deep faith revealed by your students in such a public way," he added. That character was demonstrated when the Linz siblings announced on national television that their prize money would be shared with their family. Half will go to their parents, Tom and Terri Linz, and the rest will be split seven ways among the four race participants and their three brothers who did not appear on the show. "The money doesn't equate to what our parents have done for us," Alex Linz said, "and we wanted our siblings to know that we wish they could have been there." When she heard her children's plans for their winnings, "it made me realize how special they are," said Terri Linz. "I was absolutely, totally surprised that they won. I watched each week with a lot of pride, although I did have to cover my eyes occasionally." The Linzes were on a family trip to Cancun, Mexico, during the Christmas holidays in 2004 when they were approached by a CBS casting director and asked to audition for the show. "We'd always joked that we'd never do reality TV, but 'The Amazing Race' was different," recalled Megan Linz, a 2003 graduate of St. Ursula Academy and now a student at Miami University in Ohio. "It seemed so real and so fun." This season of "The Amazing Race" was the show's first "family edition" with 10 four-person teams. The families raced from New York City to New Orleans and on to Central America. They then flew to Arizona and drove from there to Utah, Wyoming and Montana before flying to Montreal. From there, it was another drive to Toronto and a thrilling finale at Niagara Falls. From the start of the race, Alex Linz said, "we didn't really have a strategy, because we didn't really see it as a competition. It was more of an opportunity to have fun, to have an adventure. We couldn't strategize because you never knew what you were going to be asked to do next." "We did decide that we were going to try not to fight and to keep the bickering at a minimum," added his sister. "We just wanted to play the game the best we could and do it for the experience, not the prize." "The most important thing is that we were ourselves the entire time," Megan Linz added. "We never had to change who we are. We stuck to the values our parents taught us." While Megan Linz is close to her brothers and is a self-admitted tomboy, she said it was hard being the only girl on the team. "I can run with the boys for sure, but I can still be sensitive." Alex and Megan Linz both say the experience opened their eyes to different cultures and taught them patience and the importance of teamwork. "It also reinforced what I already knew - that I have a great family," Alex Linz said. Copyright (c) 2006 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops

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Copyright (c) 2007 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops


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