Skip to content

Fearful 'superbugs' may be cured by ordinary painkillers

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
3/14/2014 (3 years ago)
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Anti-inflammatory painkillers found to have secondary effect of preventing multiplication of bacteria

"Superbugs," diseases which seem immune to the most advanced reaches of science, may in fact be vanquished with something you may have in your drug cabinet right now. In a study published in the scientific journal "Chemistry & Biology," Australian researchers have found that many common painkillers have the secondary effect of preventing some bacteria from multiplying.

Bromfenac is a pain-killing medication usually applied to the eyes following cataract surgery.

Bromfenac is a pain-killing medication usually applied to the eyes following cataract surgery.

Highlights

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)
3/14/2014 (3 years ago)

Published in Health

Keywords: Painkillers, anti-inflmmatories, superbugs


LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - Researchers at the University of Wollongong in Australia found this to be true of anti-inflammatory painkillers, which are used for maladies such as arthritis and eye ailments.

Drug-resistant infections have been blamed on the excessive use of antibiotics, resulting in the reduced effectiveness of many traditional drugs. Once easily killed by antibiotics, the now resilient bacteria have sent shockwaves throughout the medical community. 

WISH POPE FRANCIS A HAPPY ANNIVERSARY!

Infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria hit about two million people in the U.S. each year, leading to at least 23,000 deaths, according to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Drugs involved in the Australian study are non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, a class of medications that also includes such common household over-the-counter medication such as aspirin and Ibuprofen.

"The fact that the bacteria-killing effect of the anti-inflammatory drugs is different from conventional drugs means that the NSAIDS could be developed into new kinds of antibiotics that are effective against so-called superbugs," the research report's lead author, Associate Professor Aaron Oakley, said. "This is important because the superbugs have become resistant to many, and in some cases most of the available antibiotics."

Three pain relievers used to treat various ailments in people as well as pets bromfenac, carprofen and vedaprofen - and found that they all had the ability to stop replication among some bacteria.

The researchers said they found that the drugs acted on bacteria in a way that is fundamentally different from current antibiotics by binding to a part of a bacterium called a "DNA clamp," preventing the organism from replicating or repairing its DNA and thus eventually killing it. No current antibiotics target the DNA clamp, Oakley says.

Some experts said it is too early to know if the study's findings will lead to a new class of antibacterial drugs. "I saw no compelling connection made between the biochemical activities that were observed and the antibacterial activity," Richard H. Ebright, professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Rutgers University, says.

It's agreed that the Australian research is headed in the right direction. "While our research is a long way from clinical trials, the fact that the bacteria-killing effects of the anti-inflammatories are different from conventional drugs means that they could be developed into new kinds of antibiotics," Ebright said.

---


'Help give every student and teacher Free resources for a world-class moral Catholic education'


Copyright 2017 - Distributed by THE CALIFORNIA NETWORK

Pope Francis Prayer Intentions for APRIL 2017
Young People.
That young people may respond generously to their vocations and seriously consider offering themselves to God in the priesthood or consecrated life.


Comments


More Health

Has the Fountain of Youth FINALLY been discovered? Watch

Image of Can umbilical cord plasma reverse the brain's aging?

A new Stanford study revealed what many believe could be the first step to a true cure for aging. LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - The ... continue reading


Can cancer REALLY be cured by a simple vitamin? Watch

Image of Can vitamins really cure cancer?

Scientists believe an extremely high dose of one vitamin may be the cure for cancer. LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - There have been ... continue reading


Two-thirds of cancers may have a surprising cause that we can do nothing about Watch

Image of Scientists have found that two-thirds of all cancer cases may be the result of random, bad-luck mutations.

If you are afraid of cancer, we have bad news. There may be little way to avoid the dreaded disease. A new study affirms that two-thirds of ... continue reading


Neil Gorsuch and end-of-life care: What ethical stance does he take? Watch

Image of Neil Gorsuch offers his views on end-of-life care.

Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch made a crucial ethical distinction in his response to questions about doctor-prescribed suicide during ... continue reading


'Three-parent babies' are coming. We are resistant to wisdom, let's pray we are resistant to the consequences Watch

Image of Designer babies have arrived.

British doctors have been given the OK to create embryos from three parents to prevent genetic diseases. The first such child could be born ... continue reading


Never Miss any Updates!

Stay up to date with the latest news, information, and special offers.

Catholic Online Logo

Copyright 2017 Catholic Online. All materials contained on this site, whether written, audible or visual are the exclusive property of Catholic Online and are protected under U.S. and International copyright laws, © Copyright 2017 Catholic Online. Any unauthorized use, without prior written consent of Catholic Online is strictly forbidden and prohibited.