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Why is this Week Called Holy? Take This Cup

We all experience "Gethsemanes" in our own lives; times of difficulty, deep sorrow, loss, distress, fear and anguish.

It is often those times and circumstances that become the very path to holiness if we learn to love as He loves. Our Christian vocation is to live as He lives, to love as He loves and to thereby become

It is often those times and circumstances that become the very path to holiness if we learn to love as He loves. Our Christian vocation is to live as He lives, to love as He loves and to thereby become "holy" as He is holy. We are invited to embrace the way of surrendered love.


CHESAPEAKE, VA. (Catholic Online) - "Then going out he went, as was his custom, to the Mount of Olives, and the disciples followed him. When he arrived at the place he said to them, "Pray that you may not undergo the test." After withdrawing about a stone's throw from them and kneeling, he prayed, saying, "Father, if you are willing, take this cup away from me; still, not my will but yours be done." (And to strengthen him an angel from heaven appeared to him. He was in such agony and he prayed so fervently that his sweat became like drops of blood falling on the ground.) When he rose from prayer -and returned to his disciples- he found them sleeping from grief. He said to them, "Why are you sleeping? Get up and pray that you may not undergo the test." (Luke 22: 39-42) This Sunday we enter into Holy Week. Christians will gather in sanctuaries throughout the world and wave Palm branches in imitation of those who lined the streets at Jesus┤ triumphal entry. We will follow the path of His struggle, the way of His rejection and we will be invited to climb the mountain of His great saving act of unmerited selfless Divine love. During this week we are invited to enter into His pattern of surrendered love; to walk this way with Jesus, who, in His Sacred humanity, teaches us the path to our own transformation. The agony in that garden called Gethsemane shows us a very human Jesus. Yes, He was Divine and, because of that, He alone could do for us what we could not do for ourselves, restoring through His passion and death the broken relationship between God and the people whom He fashioned for love and communion. With His outstretched arms, He bridged the gap between heaven and earth. In His triumph over death he defeated the last enemy and began the new creation. In His Sacred humanity this man Jesus shows each of us how to live differently. We are invited to greet and embrace even that which we do not want as the very means of transformation. We have been given the grace to accept difficulties, which, when embraced in love, can actually become a path to our redemption.

The author of the letter to the Hebrews wrote "For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who has similarly been tested in every way, yet without sin." (Hebrews 14:15) The Christian tradition insists that even undeserved and unmerited suffering, when joined in love to the sufferings of Jesus Christ, can produce extraordinary fruit within us and around us. This is the mystery of suffering in the Christian life.
 
Saint Jose Maria Escriva once wrote "The great Christian revolution has been to convert pain into fruitful suffering and to turn a bad thing into something good. We have deprived the devil of this weapon; and with it we can conquer eternity." How do we treat those circumstances that cause us to struggle? How do we deal with what we find unpleasant? Do we practice an "adult" form of avoidance and run, acting as if it will all just go away like when children cover their eyes? Or do we believe that even unpleasant things and "difficult" people can actually be gifts from the hands of a loving God who invites us to walk in the way of His Son? How do we deal with unresolved conflicts or troubling relationships? Do we work toward resolution, making "love our aim" (1 Cor. 14:7), or do we avoid them, thinking they will just go away if we "pretend" they don┤t exist? Now is the time, during this week we call "Holy", to join the revolution of which this great saint writes. After all, why do we call this week "Holy"? I suggest two among many reasons. First, the story of this week is the story of an all Holy God who showed the depth of His love through the complete emptying of Himself, in and through the Passion of His Son. Second, it is holy because we are invited into that life and way of holiness that Jesus demonstrated during all of the events that we will soon commemorate. In the Old Testament the word often translated as "holy" literally meant- to be set aside, consecrated, for God. In Jesus Christ it now means even more. We who are baptized into Him are invited to live our lives now, in Him. To love as He loves; to pray as He prays, to walk as He walks, to suffer as He suffers; to confront evil the way He does. All of us inevitably experience "Gethsemanes" in our own lives, times of difficulty, deep sorrow, loss, distress, fear and anguish. Friends may have betrayed us, or those whom we love may have rejected us. Maybe things about our lives are being exposed, brought into the light, and it is "uncomfortable". It is often those times and circumstances that become the very path to holiness if we learn to love as He loves. Our Christian vocation is to live as He lives, to love as He loves and to thereby become "holy" as He is holy. We are invited to embrace the way of surrendered love. "Take this cup". It is a very human request. What is the cup we are being asked to drink? Let us decide today to make the choice and drink, saying as we do "not my will but yours be done" When we live and love this way, the very people and circumstances that once seemed to be so difficult can become the path to freedom and we learn to walk the way of forgiving love with Him as His redemptive mission continues through time. 
 

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Pope Francis: end world hunger through 'Prayer and Action'


ę 2014 - Distributed by THE NEWS CONSORTIUM

Pope Francis Prayer Intentions for July 2014
Sports:
That sports may always be occasions of human fraternity and growth.
Lay Missionaries: That the Holy Spirit may support the work of the laity who proclaim the Gospel in the poorest countries.

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1 - 10 of 19 Comments

  1. Becca
    3 years ago

    thank's alot this was quite helpfull!!!

  2. Aurora
    4 years ago

    I feel that God has made you an instrument to enlighten those who are in the dark. I believe that my reading your message was not a mere coincidence.
    Through you, He has once again answered my cry for help and inspired me to do my best to become a light of the world and salt of the earth.
    Thank you, Deacon Keith.

  3. Eleanor Hodges
    4 years ago

    Thank you so much, it was very helpfull.

  4. ISABEL MC GRADY
    4 years ago

    god bless maria jesu never hurd the saying no pain no gain no cross no crown my lord my god o how i love you how you sufferd for us your pain is our gain artical was so true we do for get the unbearing pain jesus went throu for us we no but we need to feel it inside it makes me cry the pain the thurst the nails o my lord jesus how i love you god bless every one

  5. maria jesu
    4 years ago

    its comforting to know, why we suffer but its even better when we forget through distress, to be reminded when tears and pain blinds us there is always the the reminder, no pain no gain no cross no crown..praise Jesus ..praise his Holy name.

  6. Paul James Nagy
    4 years ago

    A very inspirational message. It is so hard to accept adversity and I, for one, find it so, always seeking relief. I pray that in the spirit of this message I may accept the trials of life as a small imitation of
    Jesus' own acceptance.

  7. Joy Ann LaJeret
    4 years ago

    How many of us truly realize that when we drink the wine and eat the body at Holy Eucharist, we are called to participate in the crucifixtion and suffering of Jesus. We are committing to the pain and suffering with the acceptance our Lord had. This is a deeper mystery than we realize, when we accept the Host and Wine in a warm and loving church, far removed from "the way of the cross."

  8. Joe Montes
    4 years ago

    This is the perfect time of year to, if needed, remind ourselves of Jesus. The way Jesus lived especially knowing what he was about to face is a great example of how we should try to live our own lives. Along with this, we all should try to live in this manner daily.

  9. Sr.Roshni
    4 years ago

    Thank you very much. Your article helped me to lead people into prayer on Good Friday.

  10. jane
    4 years ago

    This writeup has helped alot. It has explained a few things.
    Again, i would like to know why everything in the bible is commemorated instead of lesson being learnt and applied to our daily activities in live.
    We often times are engrossed in acting out the script in the bible than implementing in our life.
    Pls i will be greatful if my questions are answered.
    Thank u very much


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