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Did prehistoric man hunt the woolly mammoth?

By Catholic Online (CALIFORNIA NETWORK)
1/15/2016 (1 year ago)
CALIFORNIA NETWORK (https://www.youtube.com/c/californianetwork)

Discovery of spear suggests ancient man roamed Arctic 45,000 years ago

The remains of a woolly mammoth's carcass in Siberia suggests that prehistoric man roamed the Arctic 45,000 years ago, far earlier than previous estimates of 35,000 years. The carcass' discovery, with spear marks may mean that ancient man colonized the icy regions far earlier than previously believed.

Huge animals, mammoths would provide human settlers with meat for weeks. Its fur would provide valuable clothing and its tusks would be fashioned into tools and weapons.

Huge animals, mammoths would provide human settlers with meat for weeks. Its fur would provide valuable clothing and its tusks would be fashioned into tools and weapons.

Highlights

By Catholic Online (CALIFORNIA NETWORK)
CALIFORNIA NETWORK (https://www.youtube.com/c/californianetwork)
1/15/2016 (1 year ago)

Published in Green

Keywords: Woolly mammoth, Siberia, Arctic, prehistoric man


LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - Weapon marks on the Siberian woolly mammoth carcass may give evidence that humans were present in the Arctic 10,000 years before previously imagined.

The Ice Age beast had spear wounds and damage to its tusk, Russian scientists say, suggesting its killers had tried to chop it off.



Huge animals, mammoths would provide human settlers with meat for weeks. Its fur would provide valuable clothing and its tusks would be fashioned into tools and weapons.

The carcass was first excavated in 2012 at Yenisei Bay in central Siberia. Radiocarbon dating of the animal's shinbone revealed it 45,000 years old. Close inspection of the bones showed several marks, most likely inflicted by man-made weapons.


"They include dents likely from sharp weapon tips such as thrusting spears and damage to the tusk suggestive of human attempts to separate the outside of the tusk by chopping," Dr Vladimir Pitulko, of the Russian Academy of Sciences, said.

Researchers suggest that advances in mammoth hunting techniques would enable ancient people to survive the severe Arctic conditions to spread across Siberia, placing them at the gateway to the Americas.

Settlers in the Eastern extremes of Siberia would have been able to cross the Bering land bridge, a mass of ice believed to have connected Siberia to Alaska during the Ice Age.

This configuration would have spread into the North American continent before the last glacial maximum, some 26,000 year ago.


Improved ways to hunt mammoths in turn probably facilitated humans to settle close to the Bering land bridge. This linked the icy Arctic Ocean with the Bering Sea, allowing ancient man an opportunity to enter Alaska about 30,000 years ago.

Woolly mammoths are believed to have roamed the Earth approximately 200,000 years ago. The planet Earth was undergoing a major change in climate, which may have led to the shrinking of their habitat.

Unable to find the food they needed their populations became smaller and increasingly isolated.

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