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Perfect Women

3/18/2008 - 03:03 PST

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By Cheryl Dickow

“It is evident that women are meant to form part of the living and working structure of Christianity in so prominent a manner that perhaps not all their potentialities have yet been made clear.” When John Paul II wrote Mulieris Dignitatem, his 1988 Apostolic Letter on the Dignity and Vocation of Women, he freely referred to the discourses of Paul VI, Pius XII, and John XXIII to shore up his own firm belief that women, when imbued with the Gospel, are bearers of gifts, charisms, and power (yes, he uses the word power) intended to “aid humanity in not falling.”

Imagine, “aid humanity in not falling.” That’s a powerful statement of a woman’s effectiveness and ability. So, a full twenty years after feminists took center stage and burned bras, declared their equality, and mandated a way of thinking that threw families into turmoil, John Paul II earnestly tried to set the record straight. In his document, Mulieris Dignitatem, JPII begins by exhorting what he calls “the greatness of the dignity and vocation of women.” It can be no surprise that our beloved Pope, himself in a Mary honoring relationship, would proclaim such great news within the Church and to Catholic women everywhere. One cannot be in right relationship with Christ, and His mother, and not know that Christ’s entire Messianic time on earth was exemplary in the way in which He broke with the traditional ways in which women had been mistreated to make a point. The point, as John Paul II lovingly describes, is that women understood Christ’s messages of God in a special and thoroughly unique way, a necessary way.

JPII brings into our consciousness an awareness of the women Jesus encountered and why it could be said that “Jesus’ attitude to the women whom he meets in the course of his Messianic service reflects the eternal plan of God, who, in creating each one of them, chooses her and loves her in Christ:” Simon’s mother-in-law, the woman who had the flow of blood, the widow of Nain, and the Canaanite woman, to name a few. Throughout the document on the dignity and vocation of women, JPII continually draws us back to the eternal truth of a woman’s worth due to her creation by God and boldly states that woman’s creation was for its own sake, just as was man’s, and it is an error to view God’s punishment as a result of the first sin (“he shall rule over you”) to be anything other than an evil inheritance for BOTH man and woman.

In other words, where our world has interpreted that Scripture verse salaciously, JPII eloquently reminds us that God’s original intention was for a more perfect union between man and woman. Equality was originally intended to be a measure of sameness as created beings in the likeness of God. Equal but different. Indeed, when JPII writes that “In the “unity of the two,” man and woman are called from the beginning not only to exist “side by side” or “together,” but they are also called to exist mutually “one for the other,” there is no mistaking that in subjugating either of God’s highest creations, both creatures suffer and this was never God’s plan for humankind.

Whether in regards to the societal misinterpretation of such verses as Genesis 3:16 or due to women’s general misunderstanding of their own inherent worth, the “feminist” has long ago gained momentum at the expense of what JPII refers to as her own “feminine genius” when she has chosen to pursue, at great danger, her own “masculinization.” In many ways it would seem that feminism, as a means to masculinize the female species, is incompatible with the Church but most certainly incompatible with what JPII exhorts in Mulieris Dignitatem. This is to say that a Christian woman who lives and understands her call, as a disciple of Christ, cannot also find herself on the “feminist” path where her own gifts are seen as anything less than monumental; gifts to be employed for God and for His kingdom. When a feminist claims that a woman is only fulfilled when she occupies a “man’s” role in life she is simultaneously saying to a Christian woman, “The plan God has for you is less than what you should want for yourself.” Sound serpent-like?

Additionally, it should be abundantly clear that a Christian man diminishes his own dignity and vocation when he suppresses a woman’s worth and calling. As said earlier, man is also a created being made in the image and likeness of God. As such, he cannot be called by his Creator to be anything less than loving, compassionate, wise, and forgiving in how he attempts to live out his life on earth. A Christian man understands how he is called to love his wife just as Christ loves the Church. As JPII states, “The bridegroom is the one who loves. The bride is loved.” What a beautiful illustration of God’s intention when Christ made Himself the bridegroom! A Christian man, then, conforms his own will to the will of God and in doing so, frees his ...

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1 - 1 of 1 Comments

  1. Beverly Alam
    6 years ago

    Your idea of feminism is so misconstrued that I almost couldn't bare to finish reading the article.

    You used a quotation from Pope John Paul II which stated that- The perfect woman becomes an irreplaceable support and source of spiritual strength for other people, who perceive the great energies of her spirit- a very honorable statement indeed. This is also essentially what feminists preach.

    However, YOUR article implies that feminists are devilish and manipulative for believing that women should be viewed as equal to men. You said that feminists preach that women are only fulfilled when they take on a masculine role in LIFE. THIS IS NOT WHAT FEMINISTS PREACH. They believe women should attempt to break the negative stigma they hold in SOCIETY. These stigmas include being weak, stupid, only-good-for-one-thing, less than humans. Thus, feminists argue that women should attempt to hold stronger faith in their own self worth. Persuading women to take on a masculine role in society is FAR different than persuading them to take on a masculine role in life. They should not wish to become a man, but only to hold the same value in society as a man. I believe that Pope John Paul would agree that this is an admirable mindset for a woman. In light of this, I believe that you have misunderstood his writings and will remove this text from public view.

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