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Liturgy: Both Species From an Extraordinary Minister

9/22/2004 - 7:00 AM PST

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And More on "Pro Multis"

ROME, SEPT. 22, 2004 (Zenit) - Answered by Father Edward McNamara, professor of liturgy at the Regina Apostolorum Pontifical University.

Q: I am a convert to Catholicism. Little if anything was taught to me during RCIA regarding the liturgy, yet I was immediately encouraged to become a Eucharistic minister as soon as I received the sacraments. The training I received amounted to about four hours on a Saturday. When I transferred to a different parish, all I had to do was sign up to be a Eucharistic minister. There was one brief training focusing on where to stand depending on which station you were assigned. My husband, a devout cradle Catholic, tells me that it is not appropriate to receive under both species at a Mass unless there are enough priests or deacons to administer both the Body and the Blood. He sees the use of Eucharistic ministers to distribute both species as an abuse. Is it wrong to partake of both species if both are offered, albeit by Eucharistic ministers? -- R.E., Glendale, Arizona

A: While the preparation required before appointing someone as an extraordinary minister of holy Communion may vary from place to place, the norms issued by the diocesan bishop (see "Redemptionis Sacramentum," No. 160) should always be followed.

Most bishops delegate the rite of appointment to parish priests, although some dioceses organize special courses for those called to serve in this capacity.

The 1973 instruction "Immensae Caritatis," No. 6, outlines some of the personal qualities demanded of the extraordinary minister:

"The person who has been appointed to be an extraordinary minister of Holy Communion is necessarily to be duly instructed and should distinguish himself by his Christian life, faith and morals. Let him strive to be worthy of this great office; let him cultivate devotion to the Holy Eucharist and show himself as an example to the other faithful by his piety and reverence for this most holy Sacrament of the altar. Let no one be chosen whose selection may cause scandal among the faithful."

It is thus clear that due care must be taken in selecting and forming the extraordinary ministers, presuming of course that they respond to an authentic need, because of the delicate and sacred character of the office that they are called to fulfill.

Before appointing them, the priest should have a sufficient knowledge of their moral stature and their standing in the community.

He should also ensure that they fully adhere to all of the teachings of the Church especially those regarding the belief in the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist and the Catholic understanding of the holy sacrifice of the Mass.

They should be trained not only regarding where to stand but also with regard to proper procedures to follow when approaching the altar to receive the sacred vessels from the priest; how to return them; how to avoid accidents; and how to proceed if accidents occur. They should also be instructed on the limits of their office with respect to purifying the sacred vessels and approaching the tabernacle.

Those who officiate to the sick will need supplementary instructions regarding the proper rites to be followed.

I would recommend that, in order to appreciate the importance of their service, extraordinary ministers of the Eucharist be encouraged to foment their love for the Eucharist through adoration or frequent visits to the tabernacle.

They should also have at least one retreat a year as well as other instructions in Catholic doctrine and the norms and spirit of the liturgy.

This brings us to the second part of your question.

If no priest or deacon is available to distribute the Precious Blood in the circumstances where Communion under both kinds is permitted and customary, then it cannot be considered an abuse to avail of the services of an extraordinary minister of Communion.

You write from the United States, where the distribution of Communion under both kinds at Sunday Mass has been approved by the bishops and validated by the Holy See. When needed, an extraordinary minister of Communion may assist the priest and deacon with the administration of the Precious Blood from the chalice.

There is no reason to refuse the chalice if offered in this way, although there is no obligation to do so.

While receiving Communion under both species is more perfect from the point of view of the sign, it is important to remember the Church's teachings that Christ is received whole and entire under either species.

Thus, one's Communion is perfectly complete when it is received under the species of bread alone. One is not deprived of extra graces by not receiving from the chalice.

While your husband is obviously a good ...

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