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By Fr. James Farfaglia

3/5/2012 (3 years ago)

Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Carry your cross with generosity. Carry your cross with patience, love and joy.

The transfiguration of the Lord reminds us of the outcome of the cross.  Suffering brings about transformation when we carry the cross like true disciples of Jesus. Each of us has a cross to carry.  We must all identify our crosses and carry them with patience, joy and love.  Why complain about something which is our means to gain eternal life? What is your cross?  Maybe you have many crosses to carry.  How do you carry your cross?  Do you complain?  Are you discouraged?  Do you run away from the cross?

Carry your cross with generosity.  Carry your cross with patience, love and joy.

Carry your cross with generosity. Carry your cross with patience, love and joy.

Highlights

By Fr. James Farfaglia

Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

3/5/2012 (3 years ago)

Published in Lent / Easter

Keywords: sunday homily, lent, catholic spirituality, suffering, Fr. James Farfaglia


CORPUS CHRISTI, TX (Catholic Online) - A man and a woman had a little daughter that they adored. Audrey was their only child.  They lived their whole lives for their little child.  When she became chronically ill and her illness resisted the efforts of the best doctors, the parents became totally discouraged and inconsolable. 

Soon Audrey did not survive the illness and the parents were completely distressed.  They became bitter recluses, shutting themselves off from their family and friends.  But, one night the woman had a dream.  She dreamt that she was in heaven. 

During her dream, she saw a long procession of little children processing like little angels before the throne of God.  Every child was dressed in a dazzling white robe and they each held a lit candle.  However, when the woman saw her Audrey, she noticed that her candle was not lit. 

The mother ran up to Audrey, embraced her in her arms, caressed her tenderly, and then asked her how it was that her candle was the only one that was not lit.  Audrey said, "Mother, they often relight it, but your tears always put it out."

Just at that moment the woman woke from her dream.  The lesson was clear, and its effects were immediate.  She immediately told the dream to her husband.  They decided to embrace their loss with Christian hope and that they would no longer extinguish Audrey's little candle with their useless tears. 
   
My dear friends, this Sunday's liturgy provides motivation and inspiration for us to continue our Lenten program.  It is not easy to die to self.  However, the gospel account of the transfiguration of Jesus tells us that our cross will always lead to the transformation of our lives. 

There are three transfigurations or transformations that take place in our journey towards eternity.
The first change begins at Baptism.  The immersion into the baptismal waters symbolizes death and rebirth.  The Sacrament of Baptism washes away Original Sin and we are re-created.  We are transformed into new creatures.  The old self dies and the new person in Christ Jesus is born.

Our new life, which begins at Baptism, is carried out through our daily living of the Gospel.  This of course, demands a continual dying to self.  Through self-denial, the image of Christ is made visible in our lives.  The more we die to self, the more sanctifying grace can transform our lives. 

The second transformation takes place by our victory over the trials and tribulations of life.  Every challenge, every difficulty, every moment of suffering, is an opportunity to grow.  Transformation only takes place through suffering.

A young friend of mine was diagnosed with cancer when he was nineteen years old.  He died two years latter.  Nevertheless, his acceptance of this challenge and the manner in which he embraced his daily suffering not only transformed his life, but it transformed the lives of those who were closest to him.

One day after he returned from a long week of treatments at the hospital, his dad suggested that before returning home, they stop by their parish and pray the Stations of the Cross together.  The father told his son that contemplating how much Jesus had suffered for them would be important, particularly in their present trial.  Both father and son had understood the transforming power of the Cross of Jesus.

The third transformation takes place at death.  The suffering that the final moment brings upon us makes way for an amazing transformation.  Eternal life in heaven, perhaps after a period of further transformation in purgatory, is granted to those who have been found worthy.  The last transformation or transfiguration is completed at the Second Coming when our body is reunited with our soul.  What awaits us is beyond anything that we can imagine. 

"Sacred Scripture calls this mysterious renewal, which will transform humanity and the world, 'new heavens and a new earth.' It will be the definitive realization of God's plan to bring under a single head all things in Christ, things in heaven and things on earth". 

"The visible universe, then, is itself destined to be transformed, so that the world itself, restored to its original state, facing no further obstacles, should be at the service of the just, sharing their glorification in the risen Jesus Christ" (Catechism of the Catholic Church # 1043, 1047).

When we consider the eschatological teachings of the Catholic Church, we can understand why the Easter liturgy cries out "O felix culpa." "O happy fault, O necessary sin of Adam, which gained for us so great a Redeemer" (Exsúlet - The Easter Proclamation from the Easter Vigil Liturgy).

The transfiguration of the Lord reminds us of the outcome of the cross.  Suffering brings about transformation when we carry the cross like true disciples of Jesus.Each of us has a cross to carry.  We must all identify our crosses and carry them with patience, joy and love.  Why complain about something which is our means to gain eternal life?

As Thomas a' Kempis reminds us, "The cross, therefore, is always ready; it awaits you everywhere. No matter where you may go, you cannot escape it, for wherever you go you take yourself with you and shall always find yourself.  Turn where you will -- above, below, without, or within -- you will find a cross in everything, and everywhere you must have patience if you would have peace within and merit an eternal crown."

"If you carry the cross willingly, it will carry and lead you to the desired goal where indeed there shall be no more suffering, but here there shall be. If you carry it unwillingly, you create a burden for yourself and increase the load, though still you have to bear it. If you cast away one cross, you will find another and perhaps a heavier one" (The Imitation of Christ, Book II, chapter 12).

"And after six days Jesus took with him Peter and James and John, and led them up a high mountain apart by themselves; and he was transfigured before them,  and his garments became glistening, intensely white, as no fuller on earth could bleach them" (Mark 9: 2-3).

The transfiguration of Jesus on Mount Tabor tells us that the glory of the resurrection will only take place through the sufferings of Good Friday. The transfiguration of Jesus teaches us that the experience of the cross is necessary in order for Easter to take place. 

However, too many of our contemporaries are like those who stood at the foot of the Cross and cried out to Jesus that he should come down from the Cross.  Many would like to have a Christianity without self-denial, discipline and renunciation.  However, Christianity without the Cross is not Christianity at all. 

What is your cross?  Maybe you have many crosses to carry.  How do you carry your cross?  Do you complain?  Are you discouraged?  Do you run away from the cross? There is only one way to carry your cross. 

Carry your cross with generosity.  Carry your cross with patience, love and joy.  See in your cross your sanctification, your eternal salvation.  Understand that with your cross, united to the cross of Jesus, you have a continual opportunity to save souls and make reparation for so many sins.

-----

Acknowledgments: http://www.sermonillustrations.com/

Father James Farfaglia is the Pastor of Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church in Corpus Christi, TX.  Click here http://fatherjames.org/ and listen to Father's Sunday homilies.  Visit Father on the web and check out his book Get Serious - A Survival Guide for Serious Catholics, an inspirational and easy to follow guide for living a deeper spiritual life.  Father's new book is an excellent Lenten addition for anyone who seeks to grow in holiness.

---


Pope Francis: end world hunger through 'Prayer and Action'


Copyright 2015 - Distributed by THE CALIFORNIA NETWORK

Pope Francis Prayer Intentions for February 2016
Universal:
That prisoners, especially the young, may be able to rebuild lives of dignity.
Evangelization: That married people who are separated may find welcome and support in the Christian community.



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