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Illegitimate children of U.S. servicemen, Filipino B-girls comprise Philippines' lost generation

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
5/21/2014 (3 years ago)
Catholic Online (https://www.catholic.org)

Denied employment on account of their mixed heritage, such offspring turn to crime and drugs

Moments of indiscretion, fueled by lust has the nation of the Philippines dearly. Children, sired by United States servicemen while seeing Filipino girls while on duty overseas has produced an entire generation of mixed-race children. Denied employment on account of their skin color, this lost generation then turns to drugs and crime to cope.

Children fathered by African-Americans suffered the most prejudice. According to one estimate, a quarter of Amerasians in the Philippines are of African-American descent. Many have been denied jobs purely because of their skin color.

Children fathered by African-Americans suffered the most prejudice. According to one estimate, a quarter of Amerasians in the Philippines are of African-American descent. Many have been denied jobs purely because of their skin color.

Highlights

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
Catholic Online (https://www.catholic.org)
5/21/2014 (3 years ago)

Published in Asia Pacific

Keywords: Philippines, Amerasians, U.S. servicemen


LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - There are literally thousands of "Amerasians" fathered by U.S. military personnel now living in the Philippines.

In the more than two decades that the bases were operating, hundreds of thousands of U.S. servicemen were stationed at the naval and air force facilities or passed through on their way to conflicts in the region such as the Vietnam and Korean Wars.

Starvation never takes a vacation --

"When you meet them, they make you believe its love and that it's going to last forever, but then they just leave," one 41-year-old mother says. Each of her children has a different father. Each one was a U.S. serviceman.

There's an estimated quarter of a million Amerasians in the Philippines who can trace their heritage back to U.S. servicemen. Most are located around Angeles and Olongapo, towns north of the capital close to the Subic naval base and Clark airbase.

"My father was a black American. My mother worked behind a bar and that's where she met my father," one young woman says. "They were living together for a bit, but they didn't get married because my grandmother didn't approve of the relationship. So he left.

"When I was about 10 or 11 years old I tried looking for him, but I forgot his middle name so couldn't find him."

In a predominantly conservative society, Amerasian children were often discriminated against for being illegitimate, mixed-race or the children of prostitutes. Many have been abandoned by their mothers, who were unable to bring them up or too ashamed to keep them.

Many come of age in poverty, raised by other family members or adopted by foster parents.

In a 2010 study of the community by the Philippine Amerasian Research Institute, it was found that many of these children lived in "abject poverty", were likely to be out of work, homeless, have alcohol, drug or familial abuse problems, as well as "identity confusion, unresolved grief issues over the loss of their fathers, social isolation and low self-esteem."

Children fathered by African-Americans suffered the most prejudice. According to one estimate, a quarter of Amerasians in the Philippines are of African-American descent. Many have been denied jobs purely because of their skin color.

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