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More people saying 'no' to work: non-participating Americans not looking for work climbs to record levels

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
October 23rd, 2013
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Many more Americans are just saying no, it appears. Accord to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, more Americans 16 years and older are unemployed - and not actively seeking employment. According to the bureau, a record 90,609,000  U.S. Citizens have just accepted daytime television for the time being.

LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - The bureau counts a person as participating in the labor force if they are 16 years or older and either have a job or have actively sought a job in the last four weeks.

Americans not participating in the labor force climbed from 89,957,000 to 90,473,000 from July to August, pushing past 90,000,000 for the first time with a one month increase of 516,000.

The figure climbed again to 90,609,000in September, an increase of 136,000 during the month.

When President Barack Obama took office in 2009, there were 80,507,000 Americans not in the labor force. The number of Americans not in the labor force has increased by 10,102,000 during the current administration.

The percentage of the civilian non-institutionalized population - i.e., not in prison, jail or sanitarium -  over 16 years of age that was employed also remained constant from August to September at 58.6 percent. When President Obama took office in January 2009, the employment-population ratio was 60.6 percent.

Why? One of the chief reasons for the increasing number of people not in the labor force is the aging of the Baby Boom generation, whose members have begun retiring. These workers are not being replaced by an equal number of young people entering the labor force.

Another reason is that female participation in the labor force has been declining. In January 2009, the female labor force participation rate was 59.4 percent. In September 2013, it was 57.1 percent.

In the meantime, the lack of employment opportunities have driven many Americans to the brink of despair. "It doesn't matter that America is in decline and that our economy is not producing nearly enough jobs for everyone anymore," columnist Michael Snyder says. "In our society, one of the primary things that defines our lives is what we do for a living. Just think about it. When you are out in a social situation, what is one of the very first things that people ask? They want to know what you 'do.' Well, if you don't 'do' anything, then you are not part of the club.

"But the worst part of being unemployed for many Americans is the relentless pressure from family and friends. Often they have no idea how hard it is to find a job in this economy - especially if they still have jobs. Sometimes the pressure becomes too great," Snyder adds.

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