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World's oldest newspaper to go digital only

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
October 7th, 2013
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

It's the ultimate sign of the times. Lloyd's List, reportedly the world's oldest continuously published newspaper, is to go strictly digital by the end of this year. Founded in 1734, Lloyd's List provides the leading news, analysis and data source for the global shipping industry.

LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - The decision rendered by the newspaper's owners, Informa is being viewed as a landmark moment. A survey of readers last June showed that more than 97 percent prefer to access the journal online. The study found that fewer than two percent of Lloyd's List readers read the print version.

"We are very proud to take this next step in the evolution of Lloyd's List," editor Richard Meade said. "The digital approach offers new avenues and opportunities to innovate an up-to-the-minute service that offers in-depth news and information on every aspect of shipping."

The newspaper began life as a notice pinned to the wall of a coffee shop in London, when Lloyd's List first appeared in 1734. Founded by Edward Lloyd, he had been posting ship arrival and departure times on the wall of his 18th century London coffee shop. Nowadays, Meade says, the newspaper's readers can have access to the paper through their Smartphones and tablets.

"That aim has not changed, but the technology has and our customers are now accessing the industry's most sophisticated intelligence source in any coffee shop, anywhere in the world 24 hours a day," Meade says.

"The digital migration process has been very carefully planned and we have undertaken significant investment in our digital platforms, enabling us to provide our readers with a much enhanced and very popular service online," Informa business group's managing director, Phil Smith, said.

"This success has resulted in huge growth in digital usage, with ever-increasing numbers of customers opting for digital over print."

The newspaper's 300-year commitment "to provide news and market intelligence for the shipping industry" will continue as before "in the format our customers want and need."

"Newspaper Death Watch" maintains a list of metropolitan dailies in the U.S. that have closed since 2007. Many more have switched to a hybrid print/online model.

In an attempt to recover lost profits from dwindling print advertising, hundreds of the nation's remaining 1,382 daily newspapers such as the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post, have erected "pay walls" - where users have to pay a fee to access news and information.

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Article brought to you by: Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)