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'Blame it On the Bossa Nova' singer Eydie Gorme dies

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
August 12th, 2013
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

"Blame It On The Bossa Nova," Eydie Gorme sang in her sultry hit of 1963. The celebrated spitfire entertained millions with her nightclub and TV appearances, at times with her husband Steve Lawrence. Gorme has died at the age of 84 in Las Vegas, Nevada, after a brief illness. She was 84.

 

LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - Gorme and Lawrence also recorded Spanish-language songs which became hits in Latin America. Lawrence was at her bedside, along with their son, when she died this past weekend, her publicist said.

"Eydie has been my partner on stage and in life for more than 55 years," Lawrence said in a statement. "I fell in love with her the moment I saw her and even more the first time I heard her sing. While my personal loss is unimaginable, the world has lost one of the greatest pop vocalists of all time."

Born to Spanish-speaking Jewish parents in New York in 1928, Gorme was fluent in both English and Spanish.

She met her husband in 1953 on the set of a New York local TV program hosted by Steve Allen which became "The Tonight Show" the following year. They married in 1957.

Gorme's biggest hit was "Blame It On The Bossa Nova." She also scored another success in 1964 with the Spanish-language song, "Amor," backed by the Mexican band Trio Los Panchos. Columbia Records President Goddard Lieberson had suggested she put that Spanish to use in the recording studio.

"Amor" became a hit throughout Latin America, which resulted in more recordings for the Latino market, and Lawrence and Gorme performed as a duo throughout Latin America.
"Our Spanish stuff outsells our English recordings," Lawrence said in 2004. "She's like a diva to the Spanish world."

Gorme and Lawrence had a long-lasting career in English-language music as well, encompassing recordings and appearances on TV, in nightclubs and in concert halls.

Gorme and Lawrence adhered for the most part with the music of classic composers like Berlin, Kern, Gershwin, Cole Porter, Rodgers and Hammerstein, and other giants of Broadway and Hollywood musicals. They eschewed rock `n' roll and made no apologies for it. As they like to put it: "no punk, no funk, no rock, no schlock."

"People come with a general idea of what they're going to get," Lawrence said of their show in a 1989 interview. "They buy a certain cereal, and they know what to expect from that package."

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