Article brought to you by: Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Have the world's long lost pyramids been found on Google Earth?

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
July 22nd, 2013
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Archaeology researcher Angela Micol suggests that the long lost pyramids may have been found in the deserts of Egypt. Micol says that mounds of sand spotted there using Google Earth may very well be the site of long-lost pyramids.

LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - The mapping device pinpointed two areas along the Nile basin last year. Ninety miles apart, both contained unusual shaped mounds.

Other archaeologists scoffed about whether Micol's find was truly the unknown pyramids. Naysayers aside, a preliminary ground study using ancient maps suggests that the location might be correct.

Making her discovery at home in North Carolina last year. Micol combed images on Google Earth for a decade. She added that intriguing features including cavities and shafts have now been uncovered in a preliminary exhibition to the site, which is 12 miles from the city of Abu Sidhum along the Nile.

The site includes a 620 foot-wide triangular plateau suggesting a far larger pyramid. If genuine, it could be the largest pyramid ever discovered.

Micol also discovered that the formations are labeled as pyramids on a number of rare, antique maps. The claim attracted criticism from a number of archaeological and geological authorities, who remained skeptical that a tool like Google Earth could lead to a real discovery.

These authorities reportedly dismissed the unusual mounds as anomalies or windswept rock formations that are common in the desert.

"After the buzz simmered down, I was contacted by an Egyptian couple who claimed to have important historical references for both sites," Micol said.

Keen collectors of maps, Medhat Kamal El-Kady, former ambassador to the Sultanate of Oman and his wife Haidy Farouk Abdel-Hamid, a former counselor of the Egyptian presidency say that the formations spotted by Micol were labeled as pyramids in several of their antique documents and maps.

Both say they have 34 maps and 12 documents written by scientists and officials that support Micol's claims.

Archaeologists have also identified a second group of possible pyramids near the Fayum Oasis. Three maps have since been identified to suggest that the four mounds hide ancient treasures.

One of the maps was drawn by an engineer of Napoleon Bonaparte. "They would be the greatest pyramids known to mankind," the couple says. "We would not exaggerate if we said the finding can overshadow the Pyramids of Giza."

Mohamed Aly Soliman, who led the preliminary expedition to the site near Abu Sidhum said the mounds are made of different layers not part of the surrounding landscape, suggesting that they were indeed made by Egyptians deliberately trying to bury a structure.

Article brought to you by: Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)