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Al Qaeda sets up complaints department in Syrian city

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
June 4th, 2013
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

The terrorist organization al-Qaeda is not noted for handling through due process. In what appears to be a somewhat comical reversal of their general policy, al-Qaeda has now set up a complaints department for residents in the rebel-held city in Syria of Raqqa.

LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - Leaders posted a public notice saying that they were open to receiving complaints from citizens and would promise to ensure justice through Sharia courts.

"We promise that we will ensure accountability for anyone committing violations and they will be sent to the Sharia court of Iraq and al-Sham (Syria)," according to newspaper reports.

Al Qaeda's branch in Iraq and the most powerful rebel group in Syria, al-Nusra group, and joined ranks last April against Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime.

Raqqa became the first major city to fall entirely under rebel control in March after fighters seized it from the government.

"Anyone who might have a complaint against any element of the Islamic state, whether the Emir or an ordinary soldier, can come and submit their complaint in any headquarters building of the Islamic state," the notice reads. "The complaint should be in writing, provide details and give evidence," the notice read, signed by the "Emir" of Raqqa, a title that is often used by Al-Qaeda's leaders.

The notice is seen as an attempt to assume control over justice in the war-torn city in a further example of its bureaucracy, further evidence of Al-Qaeda's bureaucratic leanings.

Ones sterling example is when Mokhtar Belmokhtar, a leader of the terrorist group in North Africa, was severely reprimanded in letters sent by his superiors that were discovered by the Associated Press in Timbuktu. According to the letters, he did not file his expense reports on time or answer phone calls. He was also criticized for failing to carry out orders.

The letter, signed by the group's 14-member Shura Council, or governing body, describes its relationship with Belmoktar as "a bleeding wound," suggesting he resign and start his own group.

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