Skip to content

SCOTUS to rule on police cellphone searches - Are they the same as looking through a suspect's pockets?

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
4/29/2014 (2 years ago)
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Case will determine when police can access your phone during an arrest.

The Supreme Court is hearing arguments today over whether police should have the right to search cellphones without a warrant. Two appeals have reached the high court with law enforcement experts and privacy advocates on two sides of the issue.

Should police be allowed to conduct a cellphone search without a warrant?

Should police be allowed to conduct a cellphone search without a warrant?

Highlights

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)
4/29/2014 (2 years ago)

Published in Politics & Policy

Keywords: cell phone, smartphone, police, arrest, search, warrant, supreme court


LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - The Supreme Court is hearing arguments today about the legality of warrantless cell phone searches. Americans are protected from warrantless searches by the Fourth Amendment, however police have made a habit of searching cell phones for additional evidence during arrests.

Privacy advocates say that searching the cellphones goes too far, especially given the wealth of data available on a smartphone. A search of a smartphone can reveal more than whom people talk to, it can also reveal one's political and religious affiliation as well as what they read and do online. Police say this is important because it can provide additional clues and leads in criminal investigations.

Millions of people want this one common thing, but they can't find one. What is it?

Privacy advocates respond that police should not have access to this information without a warrant and that it is akin to entering a person's bedroom for a search.

It's true. Going through a person's cellphone isn't like simply going through their pockets.

The American Library Association, which catalogs digital information, said in a brief to the court, "What Americans are reading is ordinarily none of the government's business," and that because these devices can be used to read material on the web, it should require special permission for the police to access it.

However, police say that smartphones can be used to endanger officers, especially when a suspect is detained. Smartphones can detonate explosives, call or warn accomplices, or erase evidence.

A brief filed on behalf of 15 states with the court explained "Cellphones are not only capable of providing valuable evidence of a criminal offense, but are also often an instrumentality of a crime."

Previous court cases have yielded different results. In a 209 California case, police arrested a man who was later convicted with cellphone evidence of having a gang affiliation and transporting weapons. He was originally pulled over for having expired tags. Because his license was suspended, police searched his car and found more evidence of crime, and also went into his cellphone to learn he was affiliated with a gang.

California courts have upheld the search as legal.

Meanwhile, a case in Boston involved a man arrested for selling drugs. His phone rang in the police station and police traced the number to an apartment where they found more drugs and a gun. An appeals court tossed the conviction.

The two cases are Riley v. California and U.S. v. Wurie and the high court is expected to rule by late June.

---


'Help give every student and teacher Free resources for a world-class moral Catholic education'


Copyright 2017 - Distributed by THE CALIFORNIA NETWORK

Pope Francis Prayer Intentions for MARCH 2017
Support for Persecuted Christians.
That persecuted Christians may be supported by the prayers and material help of the whole Church.


Comments


More Politics & Policy

Mo Brooks submits no-nonsense bill to repeal Obamacare Watch

Image of Mo Brooks wants to restore healthcare to what is was before Obama mangled it.

Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL), has submitted a bill to repeal Obamacare. The two-page document contains a simple sentence. LOS ANGELES, CA ... continue reading


Paul Ryan you're FIRED! Speaker Ryan's failure to repeal Obamacare reveals a weakness Watch

Image of Speaker Ryan has failed the easiest assignment yet. It isn't going to get easier.

Paul Ryan has let America down and failed his party, his president, and you, his constituents. Ryan was given a golden opportunity and a ... continue reading


Will Neil Gorsuch overturn Roe v. Wade? Watch

Image of Neil Gorsuch is a pro-life justice who could help save children from abortion.

Donald Trump's Supreme Court replacement pick, Neil Gorsuch is sailing though his confirmation hearing and is on his way to a confirmation ... continue reading


New Mexico bishops warn politicians, 'We speak for the Church' Watch

Image of The bishops have warned the politicians of New Mexico not to construe their personal opinions as consistent with Church teaching.

The bishops of New Mexico have issued a statement warning Catholic politicians not to take public stances against the teachings of their ... continue reading


Was Trump wiretapped? One tantalizing clue says YES Watch

Image of President Trump believes his office was wiretapped before the election.

Did Obama spy on Trump during the election? On March 4, President Trump accused former president, Obama of spying on him. The allegations ... continue reading


Never Miss any Updates!

Stay up to date with the latest news, information, and special offers.

Catholic Online Logo

Copyright 2017 Catholic Online. All materials contained on this site, whether written, audible or visual are the exclusive property of Catholic Online and are protected under U.S. and International copyright laws, © Copyright 2017 Catholic Online. Any unauthorized use, without prior written consent of Catholic Online is strictly forbidden and prohibited.