Skip to content

United Nations: A cure for world hunger - eat bugs

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
5/14/2013 (4 years ago)
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Insects are high in protein and plentiful, experts say

With much of the world going to bed hungry every night, the United Nations is now espousing a solution that is inexpensive and is immediately accessible to all: People should just start eating bugs. That's right, experts say that such untapped foodstuffs as grasshoppers, ants and other members of the insect world makes for an ideal feed supply for humans, pets and livestock.

Insects can also be rich in copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, selenium and zinc, and are an excellent source of fiber.

Insects can also be rich in copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, selenium and zinc, and are an excellent source of fiber.

Highlights

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)
5/14/2013 (4 years ago)

Published in Home & Food

Keywords: Insecvts, protein, insect farms, eatign insects, United Nations, report


LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - In a 200-page report at the U.N. agency's Rome headquarters, the survey points out that two billion people worldwide already supplement their diets with insects, which are high in protein and minerals and have environmental benefits.

The report states that insects are "extremely efficient" in converting feed into edible meat. On average, they can convert more than four pounds of feed into over two pounds of insect mass. Cattle, in contrast require 17.6 pounds of feed to produce a kilo of meat.

In addition, most insects are likely to produce fewer environmentally harmful greenhouse gases. In another salient selling point, insects also feed on human and food waste - sounds appetizing!, compost and animal slurry, with the products being used for agricultural feed.

Insect farming today usually takes place in family-run farms that cater to niche markets. The U.N. says that more mechanization is needed in order to ratchet up insect farming production. The fish bait industry, for example, has long farmed insects.

Insect farming is "one of the many ways to address food and feed security," the food agency said. "Insects are everywhere and they reproduce quickly," leaving a "low environmental footprint." They provide high-quality protein and nutrients when compared with meat and fish and are "particularly important as a food supplement for undernourished children," the report reads.

Insects can also be rich in copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, selenium and zinc, and are an excellent source of fiber.

The Edible Insect Program is also examining the nutritional potential of arachnids-i.e., spiders and scorpions.

Certain beetles, ants, crickets and grasshoppers, come close to lean red meat or broiled fish in terms of protein per ounce, according to university analysis.

The main stumbling point to determine if this idea has weight - are insects tasty? The report noted that some caterpillars in southern Africa and weaver ant eggs in Southeast Asia are considered delicacies and command high prices.

For most of us, however, the ingestion of insects will continue to be something that we do unintentionally - such as when a fly drowns in out morning cup of coffee, and we wonder - "Did that sugar cube have time to melt?"

---


'Help give every student and teacher Free resources for a world-class moral Catholic education'


Copyright 2017 - Distributed by THE CALIFORNIA NETWORK

Pope Francis Prayer Intentions for OCTOBER 2017
Workers and the Unemployed.
That all workers may receive respect and protection of their rights, and that the unemployed may receive the opportunity to contribute to the common good.


Comments


Never Miss any Updates!

Stay up to date with the latest news, information, and special offers.

Information
Learn about Catholic world

Catholic Online
Inform - Inspire - Ignite

Catholic Online Saints
Your saints explained

Catholic Online Prayers
Prayers for every need

Catholic Online Bible
Complete bible online

Catholic Online News
Your news Catholic eye

Daily Reading
Today's bible reading

Lent / Easter
Death & resurrection of Jesus

Advent / Christmas
Birth of Jesus

Rest of Catholic Online
All Catholic world we offer

Services
Products and services we offer

Catholic Online Shopping
Catholic medals, gifts & books

The California Network
Inspiring streaming service

Advertise on Catholic Online
Your ads on catholic.org

Catholic Online Email
Email with Catholic feel

Catholic Online Singles
Safe, secure Catholic dating

The California Studios
World-class post production service

Education
Learn the Catholic way

Catholic Online School
Free Catholic education for all

Student Classes
K-12 & Adult Education Classes

Catholic Online MasterClass
Learn from experts

School Teachers
Teacher lesson plans & resources

Catholic Media Missionaries
The New Evangelization

Support Free Education
Tax deductible support Free education

Socials
Connect with us online

Catholic Online on Facebook
Catholic social network

Catholic Online on Twitter
Catholic Tweets

Catholic Online on YouTube
Enjoy our videos

Catholic Online on Instagram
Shared Catholic moments

Catholic Online on Pinterest
Catholic ideas style inspiration

Catholic Online Logo

Copyright 2017 Catholic Online. All materials contained on this site, whether written, audible or visual are the exclusive property of Catholic Online and are protected under U.S. and International copyright laws, © Copyright 2017 Catholic Online. Any unauthorized use, without prior written consent of Catholic Online is strictly forbidden and prohibited.