Skip to content

In the Kingdom of God No One is Unemployed

By Elise Harris (CNA/EWTN News)
9/24/2017 (3 weeks ago)
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Pope Francis leads pilgrims in powerful prayer

No one is "unemployed" when it comes to spreading the message of the Gospel, Pope Francis has said, because each one of us is called to take up the task and to do our own part in God's plan of salvation.

Pope Francis reminds that with God hope is always possible.

Pope Francis reminds that with God hope is always possible.

Highlights

By Elise Harris (CNA/EWTN News)
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)
9/24/2017 (3 weeks ago)

Published in Living Faith

Keywords: Pope Francis, Angelus, Pope, God, Jesus, Faith, Hope


Vatican City, Sep 24, 2017 / 08:03 am (CNA/EWTN News) - "The message is this: in the Kingdom of God no one is unemployed, everyone is called to do their part," the Pope said Sunday Sept. 24.

"And for everyone there will be the compensation of divine justice - not human (justice), fortunately! - which is the salvation that Jesus Christ acquired for us with his death and resurrection."

This salvation is "not merited, but given," Francis said, explaining that this is why Jesus in the Gospel says "the first shall be last and the last shall be first."


He spoke to pilgrims present in St. Peter's Square for his Sunday Angelus address, focusing on the day's Gospel from Matthew which focuses on the parable of the landowner who hires men to work in his vineyard at all hours of the day, and in the end pays them all equally. 

Jesus tells his disciples this parable to communicate two different aspects of the Kingdom of God, Pope Francis said. The first is that "God wants to call everyone to work in his kingdom," and the second is that "in the end he wants to give everyone the same reward, which is salvation, eternal life."

When the end of the day comes and everyone is paid the same amount, no matter how many hours they worked, those who labored all day understandably complained, the Pope said, because they received the same amount as those who worked less.

However, the landowner reminds them that "they received what was agreed," and if he wants to be generous, those who came earlier "should not be envious."

The Pope said that in reality, "this 'injustice' of the landowner is used to provoke, in whomever listens to the parable, a jump in level, because Jesus does not want to speak about the problem of work and a just salary, but the Kingdom of God."

In telling the parable, Jesus wants to open our hearts "to the logic of the Father, who is free and generous," Francis said. This means to let ourselves be "amazed and fascinated" by the ways and thoughts of God, which, he noted, "are not our ways and thoughts."

Rather, the thoughts of mankind are often marked by selfishness and personal gain, and frequently our "narrow and winding" paths are not comparable to those of the Lord, which are "broad and straight."

"The Lord uses mercy, forgives widely and is full of generosity and goodness that pours onto each one of us, and opens to all the boundless territories of his love and grace, which alone can give the human heart the fullness of joy," he said.

Jesus, Francis said, makes us contemplate the specific gaze of the landowner, which is "the gaze with which he sees each one of his laborers waiting for work" and is the gaze with which he calls us "to go into his vineyard."

His gaze is also one that calls, invites one to get up and start walking, the Pope said, because the Lord wants the fullness of life for each person, one that is committed and "saved from emptiness and inertia."

"God does not want to exclude anyone and he wants everyone to reach their fullness," he said, adding that "this is love, the love of our Father."

He closed his address asking that the Virgin Mary help us to welcome "the logic of love" into our lives, "which frees us from the presumption of earning the reward of God and from negative judgments of others."


After leading pilgrims in the traditional Marian prayer, Pope Francis noted that Fr. Stanley Francis Rother was beatified Saturday in Oklahoma City.

Considered a martyr, Fr. Rother was killed in hatred of the faith "for his work of evangelization and of human promotion in favor of the most poor in Guatemala," the Pope said.

He then prayed that Fr. Rother's "heroic example" would help us to be "courageous witnesses of the Gospel, committing ourselves to promoting the dignity of the human being."

---


'Help give every student and teacher Free resources for a world-class moral Catholic education'


Copyright 2017 - Distributed by THE CALIFORNIA NETWORK

Pope Francis Prayer Intentions for OCTOBER 2017
Workers and the Unemployed.
That all workers may receive respect and protection of their rights, and that the unemployed may receive the opportunity to contribute to the common good.


Comments


Never Miss any Updates!

Stay up to date with the latest news, information, and special offers.

Information
Learn about Catholic world

Catholic Online
Inform - Inspire - Ignite

Catholic Online Saints
Your saints explained

Catholic Online Prayers
Prayers for every need

Catholic Online Bible
Complete bible online

Catholic Online News
Your news Catholic eye

Daily Reading
Today's bible reading

Lent / Easter
Death & resurrection of Jesus

Advent / Christmas
Birth of Jesus

Rest of Catholic Online
All Catholic world we offer

Services
Products and services we offer

Catholic Online Shopping
Catholic medals, gifts & books

The California Network
Inspiring streaming service

Advertise on Catholic Online
Your ads on catholic.org

Catholic Online Email
Email with Catholic feel

Catholic Online Singles
Safe, secure Catholic dating

The California Studios
World-class post production service

Education
Learn the Catholic way

Catholic Online School
Free Catholic education for all

Student Classes
K-12 & Adult Education Classes

Catholic Online MasterClass
Learn from experts

School Teachers
Teacher lesson plans & resources

Catholic Media Missionaries
The New Evangelization

Support Free Education
Tax deductible support Free education

Socials
Connect with us online

Catholic Online on Facebook
Catholic social network

Catholic Online on Twitter
Catholic Tweets

Catholic Online on YouTube
Enjoy our videos

Catholic Online on Instagram
Shared Catholic moments

Catholic Online on Pinterest
Catholic ideas style inspiration

Catholic Online Logo

Copyright 2017 Catholic Online. All materials contained on this site, whether written, audible or visual are the exclusive property of Catholic Online and are protected under U.S. and International copyright laws, © Copyright 2017 Catholic Online. Any unauthorized use, without prior written consent of Catholic Online is strictly forbidden and prohibited.