Skip to content

Bats are the super animals, science says! New study reveals that not only can these flying pest eaters see sound, but they can also see invisible light

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
7/23/2014 (2 years ago)
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

Polarized light used by bats to navigate

Polarized light may be a useful tool for bats to navigate, and the greater mouse-eared bat-Myotis myotis-is the first mammal known to navigate using polarized light.

Bats can see with polarized light, and may use it to navigate with, a new study says.

Bats can see with polarized light, and may use it to navigate with, a new study says.

Highlights

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)
Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)
7/23/2014 (2 years ago)

Published in Green

Keywords: Science, International


LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - Polarized light is light waves that are parallel to each other and vibrate on a single plane. These bats use the polarized rays at sunset to calibrate their internal compass and fly in the right direction, according to a study published in the journal Nature Communications on July 22.

You can bring a light into the darkness with "prayer and action."

"Every night through the spring, summer and autumn, bats leave their roosts in caves, trees and buildings to search for insect prey," said Stefan Greif, a biologist at Queen's University Belfast in Northern Ireland and co-author of the study.

These bats often fly hundreds of miles in a single night, returning to their homes prior to sunrise to avoid predators, "but, until now, how they achieved such feats of navigate wasn't clear," Greif said.

Bats are one well known example of animals using echolocation to sense prey, communicate and navigate while flying, but this sense only extends to about 160 feet, so the researchers thought the animals had to be using another sense to see farther ahead.

Greif and his team showed that 70 adult female bats two different polarization patterns at sunset, then they released them at two different locations in Bulgaria at one in the morning-when there was no polarization visible-about 12 to 16 miles from their home roosts.

Using radio transmitters, the team tracked the animals' movements. The bats shown shifted polarized light flew at a ring angle to the direction of bats shown unshifted polarized light, suggesting that polarized light is used to guide their flight.

While the study did show a direct connection between bat navigation and polarized light, researchers are unsure of how the bats detect the light waves. "We don't know which structure these bats might be using," said the study's co-author, Richard Holland in a statement.

---


'Help give every student and teacher Free resources for a world-class moral Catholic education'


Copyright 2017 - Distributed by THE CALIFORNIA NETWORK

Pope Francis Prayer Intentions for APRIL 2017
Young People.
That young people may respond generously to their vocations and seriously consider offering themselves to God in the priesthood or consecrated life.


Comments


More Green

Report claims extreme weather on DECLINE - but is someone lying? Watch

Image of The dispute over methodology could be killing us all.

There are claims that extreme weather is on the decline, in spite of claims that global warming is on the rise. The suggestion is global ... continue reading


Decades-old conundrum solved by chance - Can one of nature's squiggly insects change the fate of the world? Watch

Image of Are wax worms the answer to our plastic waste problem?

What if one of the world's more significant issues can be corrected with help from one of the smallest, seemingly insignificant of ... continue reading


Oroville Dam Breach? DWR Investigating Leaking - Hasn't Revealed this to the Public Watch

Image of The green area on the face of the dam suggests water is seeping though the dam.

A Leak in the core of an Earthen Dam is known to trigger catastrophic failure within hours.  Oroville's Earthen Dam has a persistent ... continue reading


Scientists discover a scary Antarctic mystery - how worried should we be? Watch

Image of Antarctica is melting, but without more data, it's too soon to worry.

Antarctica may be melting faster than thought, according to a new study. Antarctica is a region of concern because its ice, if melted, ... continue reading


The Arctic is drowning in plastic, and it could kill us all Watch

Image of A sea lion is tangled in a net, the result of decades of human disregard for the environment.

Our planet is drowning in plastic, and this is becoming obvious, even in the pristine Arctic. Researcher now estimate that up to 1,200 tons ... continue reading


Never Miss any Updates!

Stay up to date with the latest news, information, and special offers.

Catholic Online Logo

Copyright 2017 Catholic Online. All materials contained on this site, whether written, audible or visual are the exclusive property of Catholic Online and are protected under U.S. and International copyright laws, © Copyright 2017 Catholic Online. Any unauthorized use, without prior written consent of Catholic Online is strictly forbidden and prohibited.