Skip to content
Catholic Online Logo
I invite you to think back on the Sisters who educated you, your children, your grandchildren, and those in the parishes where you have been spiritually nourished.

This Feast of the Lord's Presentation in the Temple, has been observed for many years now as an occasion to acknowledge the contributions of Religious to the life of the Church.  That day was chosen by Pope John Paul precisely because on that day the Infant Christ is proclaimed as a "light for the nations" and the Holy Father - along with the whole Church - sees Religious as particularly responsible for bearing that light of Christ to the Church and to the world, giving us an opportunity to thank God for the life and witness of those in consecrated life and also to pray for many more young men and women to join their ranks

Highlights

By Rev. Peter M. J. Stravinskas, Ph D, STD, Executive Director Catholic Education Foundation

Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

2/2/2014 (11 months ago)

Published in Daily Homilies

Keywords: nuns, sisters, Feast of the Presentation, Rev. Peter M. J. Stravinskas, homilies, Catholic Education Foundation


PINE BEACH, N.J. (Catholic Online) - This Feast of the Lord's Presentation in the Temple, has been observed for many years now as an occasion to acknowledge the contributions of Religious to the life of the Church.  That day was chosen by Pope John Paul precisely because on that day the Infant Christ is proclaimed as a "light for the nations" and the Holy Father - along with the whole Church - sees Religious as particularly responsible for bearing that light of Christ to the Church and to the world, giving us an opportunity to thank God for the life and witness of those in consecrated life and also to pray for many more young men and women to join their ranks.
   
For decades now, we have been treated to unrelenting barrages of negativity about the damage allegedly done to generations of Catholic school children by the nuns of yesteryear.  We have also witnessed some very sad developments in religious life in the post-conciliar period - loss of faith and loss of identity.  I would like to address both concerns for the remainder of this homily by paying tribute to the outstanding women Religious who educated me.  I shall mention each and every one by name, highlighting one especially memorable aspect of that Sister's relationship to me and my human and spiritual development.  As I do so, I invite you to think back on the Sisters who educated you, your children, your grandchildren, and those in the parishes where you have been spiritually nourished.
   
From 1954 to 1968, I attended three Catholic elementary and secondary schools, operated by three different religious communities in two dioceses.  In that entire time, I received a superb education at every level, never saw a single child brutalized, and genuinely looked forward to every day of school.  Were all the nuns perfect?  Of course not.  And one or two were, shall we say, "off-base," but where don't you find that?  At any rate, permit me to launch into my personal litany of thanksgiving, most appropriate coming on the heels of Catholic Schools Week; again, to my own litany, unite your own.

1.  Sister Matthew Joseph accepted into the parish kindergarten a boy whose parents were not married in the Church and who seemingly had no intention of ever practicing their Faith.

2.  Sisters Grace Gabriel and Grace dePaul, principals from kindergarten through fifth grade, befriended my mother, made her a full-time volunteer, and helped bring her and my father back to Catholic practice.

3.  Sister Rita Gertrude had taught second grade in the same classroom for 56 years, worked until the age of 92, and died at the age of 102, having over 3000 people at her funeral.  She was quite a spit-fire.  When John XXIII was elected in 1958, she informed us that she was disappointed by the election of another Italian but assured us that would change soon.  Twenty years later, my mother smilingly noted that Sister Rita must have been pleased with the election of John Paul II - although she would surely have preferred an Irishman!  She was also the nun who told us that people that don't go to Mass on Sunday go to Hell, causing me to share that insight with my non-practicing parents at the time.

4.  Sister Vincent dePaul lovingly and carefully prepared us for our First Holy Communion, an event still indelibly etched on my consciousness.

5.  Sister Miriam Eucharia told my mother that I was too good to live in this world and that she would be praying for me to die the day after my First Holy Communion.  My mother thought she was a bit weird and was rather relieved that Sister's prayer was not heeded.
                                           
6.  Sister Mary Vera was the woman who did massive amounts of research on epilepsy when she was informed I had fallen victim to the disease.  With eighty-one other children in the third grade, she still noticed any time my eyebrows fluttered - one of the advance warning signals of a possible impending seizure.

7.  Sister Regina Rose in the fifth grade predicted to my parents that I would be a priest, a teacher and a writer.  I took her out to dinner a couple of years ago for her ninety-fifth birthday.

8.  Sister St. Roch, my sixth grade teacher, left Ireland at the age of seventeen, with her mother pregnant with a baby boy whom she never met until her father's funeral eighteen years later.  Whenever she got homesick, she would ask us to belt out a chorus of "Danny Boy" to cheer her up.

9.  Sister Dorothy Ann gave me straight C's my first quarter in seventh grade.  She's the only nun my mother ever challenged.  The grades were changed - by the pastor - and Sister now says I was the finest student she ever had.  She and Sister Regina both attended my First Mass.

10.  Sister Laureen Francis was my junior high principal and eighth-grade teacher.  She had the rare treat of teaching both me and Bruce Springsteen at the same time.

High school was an interesting time, occurring as it did in the midst of the Second Vatican Council and the secular spirit of rebellion spawned by what has become known as the "Vietnam War era."  Not surprisingly, then, our tiny parish high school went through three principals in four years: Sister Mary Joseph, Sister Francis Joseph, and Sister Mary Janice.  Each one concluded that "kids today are 'ungovernable'."  It was the first time we ever saw authority figures "blink".

1.  Sister Ann Marie was the most beautiful nun I have ever encountered; in fact, we later learned, she had been a model before entering the convent.  By year's end because of faculty shuffling, this freshman boy with a crush on her ended up having her for homeroom, religion, art and algebra!

2.  Sister Maria Gemma was a feisty young nun, who taught French and served as the moderator of the Mission Club; she threw me out of Senior French class for three months because I had gotten into a battle with the girl behind me who was "bidding" on me for the Senior Prom!  Sister Gemma was the first and only nun in our school to wear a modified habit at the time; she was also the first to leave religious life.

3.  Sister Stella Grace taught forty boys Sophomore English, holding our interest and never speaking above a whisper.  She died during our Senior year, when we also discovered that she had had terminal cancer throughout our high school career although no one ever suspected it because of her enthusiasm and joy.  We dedicated our Senior yearbook to her.

4.  Sister Patricia William was our Freshman World History teacher and Forensics coach.  She got me into speech and debating only because I was too embarrassed to say I didn't know what "forensics" was and, after learning, afraid to tell her "no".

5.  Sister Rose Catherine taught us biology; she spiced things up by having a life-size model of the human anatomy which she called "Shim" since it had all the necessary equipment for both genders.

6.  Sister Mary Augustine was a brilliant historian, who had the audacity to expect Juniors to take notes and be responsible for the material she delivered in classroom lectures.

7.  Sister Mary Jordan tried to teach us chemistry.  A kindly young Sister, her only flaw was that she presumed we had all walked into the room having the interests and abilities of Lavoisier, and she operated accordingly - to her frustration and ours.

8.  Sister Robert Mary, nicknamed "Parvus Caesar" (Little Caesar), was one of the Latin teachers.  She didn't exactly exude the milk of human kindness, but she was an exacting taskmaster for the first two critical years of the language, and I am still grateful for her approach.

9.  Sister Ann Virginia privately tutored me for my third year of Latin; compared to "Parvus Caesar," she was rather lackluster.

10.  Sister Mary Sylvester guided us through Junior English.  A recurring theme of her off-book reflections was that the Beatles would go down in history as the beginning of the end of western civilization.

11.  Sister Francis Rita taught Algebra II.  She was one of those rare individuals who can make everything come together for a student.  For the first time in my life, math made sense as I not only did the right thing but knew why I was doing it.  She was eighty-four in my Junior year.  The next time I saw her after graduation, I was at the Dominican Sisters' motherhouse some ten years later for a funeral.  She saw me at a hundred yards, rushed toward me, dropped to her knees and asked for my blessing.  "In Latin, please," she said as she peeked up from her veil.

12.  Sister Mary Joan taught four of us stalwarts Vergil in Senior year.  She offered me an "A" in exchange for teaching her first-year Latin class, so that she could have a free period!  Needless to say, hers was not a major academic contribution to my education.

13.  Sister Mary Alma guided us through Senior English.  She was a dynamic and learned late-middle-aged woman.  A year into my seminary experience, she wrote to tell me she had left religious life because it had already unraveled to the point that it was not what she had joined forty years earlier.
 
Well, that's my saga of life with the nuns.  As I said at the outset, they weren't all perfect, but fairness demands that I say that their communal successes far outweighed any individual failures.  And, in light of today's Gospel, one can see - in hindsight - that the presence of the Sisters in our schools as salt and light was indeed taken for granted and that we now sorely miss their dedicated and loving witness.
   
I hope that some of their example, however, moved me - and many of you as well - to take up their example to be salt and light in the circumstances of our lives.  As we thank God today for who those good women were and for what they accomplished to make the Church in our country great, let us also beseech the Lord that He would raise up women today to form new communities of  Religious to replenish their ranks, communities that will be faithful to the true identity of consecrated life and that will offer new generations of young Catholics even a tenth of what so many of us received at their hands, so graciously and so generously.
-----

Rev. Peter M. J. Stravinskas, Ph.D., S.T.D. is the Executive Director of the Catholic Education Foundation. The mission of  The Catholic Education Foundation is to serve as a forum through which teachers, administrators and all others interested in Catholic education can share ideas and practices, as well as to highlight successful programs and initiatives to bring about a recovery of Catholic education in our times.The Catholic Education Foundation, Inc. is a 501(c)3 national non-profit organization formed to ensure a brighter future for Catholic education in the United States.

---


Pope Francis: end world hunger through 'Prayer and Action'


2014 - Distributed by THE NEWS CONSORTIUM

Pope Francis Prayer Intentions for January 2015
General Intention:
That those from diverse religious traditions and all people of good will may work together for peace.
Missionary Intention: That in this year dedicated to consecrated life, religious men and women may rediscover the joy of following Christ and strive to serve the poor with zeal.



Comments


More Daily Homilies

Friday, January 30 - Homily: St. Hyacinth and Perseverance Watch

Image of Fr. Alan on the virtue of perseverance and how this was so important in the life of St. Hyacinth of Mariscotti.

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)

Fr. Alan on the virtue of perseverance and how this was so important in the life of St. Hyacinth of Mariscotti. continue reading


Thursday, January 29 - Homily: The Haves and the Have Nots Watch

Image of In today's Gospel, Our Lord says,

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)

In today's Gospel, Our Lord says, "To the one who has, more will be given; from the one who has not, even what he has will be taken away." What does that mean? continue reading


Wednesday, January 28 - Homily: The Parable of the Sower Watch

Image of Let us strive to good soil and to bear a hundred fold.

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)

Let us strive to good soil and to bear a hundred fold. continue reading


Tuesday, January 27 - Homily: Brethren of the Lord & the Will of God Watch

Image of Whenever we hear

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)

Whenever we hear "brethren of the Lord," we should think of St. Jerome and that impure heresiarch, Helvidius. We should also know that doing the will of God is necessary for salvation and sanctification. continue reading


Monday, January 26 - Homily: Sins Against the Holy Spirit Watch

Image of To blaspheme against the Holy Spirit is the unforgivable sin because it hardens the heart of the sinner to such an extent that it takes a very extraordinary moral miracle to overcome.

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)

To blaspheme against the Holy Spirit is the unforgivable sin because it hardens the heart of the sinner to such an extent that it takes a very extraordinary moral miracle to overcome. Listen to Father Angelo as he relates this to our modern times. continue reading


Friday, January 23 - Homily: Mary and Joseph, Model of Marriage Watch

Image of On this day the Franciscans of the Immaculate celebrate the espousal of Mary and Joseph.

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)

On this day the Franciscans of the Immaculate celebrate the espousal of Mary and Joseph. Fr. Elias points out how the marriage of Mary and Joseph was a true marriage even though it involved a vow of virginity. Further, it is the model of all marriages based on ... continue reading


Thursday, January 22 - Homily: Pray for Legal Protection of Unborn Watch

Image of Today, in America, there is no legal protection of unborn children!?

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)

Today, in America, there is no legal protection of unborn children!? continue reading


Wednesday, January 21 - Homily: Meekness Overcomes Anger Watch

Image of Anger often leads to a lack of charity and self-control, but meekness overcomes anger in ourselves and others.

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)

Anger often leads to a lack of charity and self-control, but meekness overcomes anger in ourselves and others. continue reading


Tuesday, January 20 - Homily: Neighbor over Ritual Watch

Image of Referring to the Gospel reading where Jesus harvests grain on the Sabbath, Fr. Joachim explains how love of neighbor takes precedence over ritual law.

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)

Referring to the Gospel reading where Jesus harvests grain on the Sabbath, Fr. Joachim explains how love of neighbor takes precedence over ritual law. continue reading


Monday, January 19 - Homily: Index of Our Charity Watch

Image of Our attitude toward our neighbor is like an index of how well we are responding to God's grace.

By Catholic Online (NEWS CONSORTIUM)

Our attitude toward our neighbor is like an index of how well we are responding to God's grace. This is most apparent when we recognize Jesus in those who hurt us and forgive them. continue reading


All Daily Homilies News

Newsletters

Newsletter Sign Up icon

Stay up to date with the latest news, information, and special offers

Daily Readings

Reading 1, Hebrews 11:1-2, 8-19
1 Only faith can guarantee the blessings that we hope ... Read More

Psalm, Luke 1:69-70, 71-72, 73-75
69 and he has established for us a saving power in ... Read More

Gospel, Mark 4:35-41
35 With the coming of evening that same day, he said ... Read More

Saint of the Day

Saint of the Day for January 31st, 2015 Image

St. John Bosco
January 31: What do dreams have to with prayer? Aren't they just random ... Read More

Inform, Inspire & Ignite Logo

Find Catholic Online on Facebook and get updates right in your live feed.

Become a fan of Catholic Online on Facebook


Follow Catholic Online on Twitter and get News and Product updates.

Follow us on Twitter